Category Archives: DDoS Vendors

VPN providers urged to update OpenVPN due to critical DoS bug

The OpenVPN Project has issued a new version of its popular open source software of the same name and is urging users to implement it, as it solves a critical denial of service security vulnerability …

View post:
VPN providers urged to update OpenVPN due to critical DoS bug

SK Internet down after DDoS Attack

SK Broadband, one of the largest providers of broadband Internet access in Korea, was attacked by the Distributed Denial-of-Service (DDoS) over the weekend, disconnecting its Internet services for about an hour. DDoS is a kind of cyberattack in which multiple compromised systems are used to target a single network or a machine and make it unavailable to users. On Saturday at 10:55 a.m., the traffic on SK Broadband’s DNS server soared up to 15 million packets per second (PPS), from its usual average of about 1 million PPS. PPS refers to the number of database transactions performed per second. The Ministry of Science, ICT and Future Planning said it blocked the cyberattack on SK Broadband and a smaller attack on LG U+ with the help of the Korea Internet Security Agency (KISA) and was able to normalize the service in 70 minutes. SK Broadband users near Seocho and Dongjak distrcts in southern Seoul were without Internet from 10:55 a.m. until 12:05 p.m. on Saturday. There was also a mild attack on LG U+, the nation’s third-largest mobile carrier, but it did not have a noticeable effect on the carrier or its users, according to the ministry. The investigative team at the Science Ministry has confirmed 1,030 Internet Protocol addresses used in the DDoS attack and is analyzing the SK’s DNS server log. SK Broadband said it is planning to collect and analyze the malware codes used in the attack after it identified zombie PCs among the users. “It’s not the first time that a mobile carrier has been attacked by DDoS. We are investigating where the attack came from and the exact causes,” said Lim Young-seok, a manager at SK Broadband. “It could take a month, as in the case of previous cyberattacks on banks.” However, information security companies suggested that the DDoS attack on the mobile carrier and the Internet service provider could be a prelude to a larger cyberattack. Increased malware activity was recorded ahead of massive cyberattacks on three Korean television stations and a bank on March 20 and a June 25 attack on the Blue House website. Bitscan, a local securities company, warned that malicious links are at their most active point this year. “As malwares hover between wired and wireless networks, PCs and mobile devices that are vulnerable to cyberattacks will likely see huge damages,” said a spokesman for Bitscan. Source: http://koreajoongangdaily.joins.com/news/article/Article.aspx?aid=2997940

Continue reading here:
SK Internet down after DDoS Attack

Cleveland city website shutdown due to DDoS Attack

In retaliation for the police killing of a twelve-year-old boy in Cleveland and the fact that the names of the Police officers who shot him have not been released yet, the hacker group Anonymous claimed responsibility for shutting down the Cleveland city website early on Monday, reports VICE News. Anonymous is a loosely associated international network of activist and hacktivist entities. Anonymous is made up of individuals who hack into computer systems without permission and take data such as communications records, names, addresses, phone numbers, and credit cards. The group has become known for a series of well-publicized publicity stunts and distributed denial-of-service (DDoS) attacks on government, religious, and corporate websites. The hacker group claimed responsibility for shutting down the Cleveland city website after the boy in Cleveland died due to injuries sustained in the police shooting. The boy was shot by police after he displayed a replica gun at a Cleveland recreation center. The Cleveland Police Department said in a statement that the child had not complied with orders to raise his hands. Instead, he apparently reached towards his waist band for the replica gun. The child had reportedly been pointing the toy weapon at members of the public outside the Cudell Recreation Center, prompting a 911 call, reports Reuters. The boy was taken to Metro Health Hospital for surgery on Saturday and remained in critical condition until his death early Sunday. The two officers involved in the incident were placed on administrative leave. One of them was treated at Fairview Hospital for an ankle injury, reports Reuters. According to a report on Cleveland.com that cited the deputy chief of police, Rice did not confront the officer verbally or physically. His father, Gregory Henderson, has questioned the use of lethal force saying, “Why not taze him? You shot him twice, not once, and at the end of the day you all don’t shoot for the legs, you shoot for the upper body,” as reported VICE News. The Department’s Use of Deadly Force Investigation Team is currently investigating the incident. Source: http://sputniknews.com/us/20141125/1015137543.html

Read More:
Cleveland city website shutdown due to DDoS Attack

DDoS attacks: Will Black Friday see upturn in web site attacks?

With Black Friday, Cyber Monday and the busiest online shopping season heading into full swing, it’s a favourite time for cybercriminals hoping to cash in on the holiday hoopla. “The amount of breaches and stolen identities went up drastically in October, November and December of last year,” said Alexander Rau, national information security strategist with Symantec Canada. “There’s more online shopping going on. People are crazy about Black Friday (Nov. 28, the day after the American Thanksgiving) and Cyber Monday, people want to get the best deal in the fastest time. “If there’s a lot of traffic, that’s where the attackers and the hackers go to try to steal information if they can.” It’s not only about stealing credit card credentials — that aspect of online chicanery, while still prevalent, is only a small part of cybercrime. On the consumer side, more important to criminals now is the ability to compile entire dossiers on their victims, so when the stolen credit card data is no longer usable they still have enough personal data to carry out sophisticated identity theft scams, which can include buying cars, taking out mortgages in their victims’ names and other fraud. Companies are under increasing attacks for all manner of gain. In the hectic shopping season, keeping transactions secure is only one part of the challenge. Distributed denial of service, or DDoS, attacks can take down websites by overloading them with bogus traffic. While DDoS attacks are common in games such as Minecraft, in which competitors use them to gain an edge, or in business or for political protest, unscrupulous website operators can also use them to take a retail competitor offline during the busiest online shopping days of the year. “A distributed denial of service attack basically means that someone, in that case the attacker, is flooding a service like a web server with just garbage traffic,” said Candid Wueest, a security researcher with Symantec Security Response and author of a recent report on the evolution of DDoS attacks. “You can compare it in real life to heavy rain, and your flood drains can’t cope with all the water coming in. Now someone opens the floodgates and sends a lot of water toward you. So you’re going to be underwater and not responding to any requests, even the one from the shopper that you actually want to.” Wueest said 2014 has seen an increase of 183 per cent of just one type of attack. “They are getting stronger but sometimes also shorter,” he said. “We know sometimes to take down an online service, often it’s enough to take it down for a few minutes or a few hours, and then the word will spread and people will start shopping at a different location. It’s not uncommon that we see it during seasons like the Black Friday shopping weekend.” In the lead up to Black Friday and Cyber Monday, Wueest said already some sites are being targeted by extortionists. In the digital world, protection money is demanded as the price of leaving a website online. “What they’ll do is inform the companies, the online shops, previous to the weekend, they’ll tell them, ‘Look, you’re either going to pay us $800 … and if you don’t do it we’re going to take down your business for a few hours.’ “In the end, it’s a classical extortion, which you obviously shouldn’t respond to but it’s hard because in the online world, it can damage your brand and obviously your sales if you’re not available during the peak hours.” Where is the computing power coming from to launch these attacks? If your computer is infected with a virus, it could be what is referred to as a bot, assembled into a botnet army under the command and control of the attacker. You don’t have to be a computer genius to launch an attack. Now for the price of a Starbucks eggnog latte you can get a website taken down for an hour. “There are services which offer it for as little as $5 for one hour, meaning you pay $5 through any online currency like bitcoin or something else and they will make sure that your competitor, your enemy for online gaming, or maybe a newspaper that you didn’t like is taken off for one hour, one day or even one week,” Wueest said. For consumers, there are other things to worry about besides whether or not their favourite online shopping site is available. Identity theft is becoming more and more sophisticated and data breaches — in which companies such as Target and many others have lost personal and financial information on their customers — can leave a ticking time bomb. Long after your credit card is cancelled and you’ve let the credit-monitoring service expire, the personal data about you could be assembled in new ways to make money. “There’s a number of things that people can do to protect themselves from a lot of these different kinds of scams that are going to take place during the holidays. They do every year. This year nobody expects it to be any different” said Bob Hansmann, director of product security for Websense, a computer security company. “Essentially you want to keep your eye out for deals that look too good to be true — they typically are. Any links inside an email or even some web pages — you’re going to want to be a little wary of it. “Make sure your anti-virus software is up to date. If you’re using a Windows machine, make sure it’s patched. Make sure you’re following the normal be-careful kinds of maintenance things, and that can eliminate a lot of these kinds of risks.” Source: http://blogs.vancouversun.com/2014/11/24/ddos-as-a-service-will-black-friday-see-upturn-in-web-site-attacks/

Original post:
DDoS attacks: Will Black Friday see upturn in web site attacks?

‘DerpTrolling’ hacker group responsible for DDoS attack on Warcraft servers

According to a CNET report, a hacker group which calls itself ‘DerpTrolling’ has recently claimed responsibility for a series of distributed denial of service (DDoS) attacks on game servers for Blizzard Entertainment’s World of Warcraft online RPG. The DDoS attack which the DerpTrolling hacker group launched on the Warcraft servers crippled the servers during the launch weekend of the Warlords of Draenor game. Claiming responsibility for the attack, DerpTrolling hackers have disclosed that they had managed to seize a massive amount of user data. According to the hacking group, the user data which has been seized as a result of the attack on Warcraft servers includes login details, password, email, and credit card information from PlayStation Network accounts as well as 2K accounts. In an elaboration of user data to which it has gained access, the DerpTrolling hacker group said in a statement to CNET: “We have 800,000 from 2K and 500,000 credit card data.” The group further declared that it has approximately “2 million Comcast accounts, 620,000 Twitter accounts, 1.2 million credentials belonging to the CIA domain, 200,000 Windows Live accounts, 3 million Facebook, 1.7 million EA origins accounts, etc.” Asserting that it has altogether seized nearly 7 million usernames and passwords from its raids, the hacker group has somewhat substantiated its claim by releasing a partial list of the hacked accounts as evidence. Source: http://uncovermichigan.com/content/22039-derptrolling-hacker-group-responsible-ddos-attack-warcraft-servers

More:
‘DerpTrolling’ hacker group responsible for DDoS attack on Warcraft servers

Drupal Patches Denial of Service Vulnerability

Details on a patched denial of service vulnerability in the open source Drupal content management system have been disclosed. The vulnerability, patched yesterday, could be abused to crash a website running on the CMS. Researchers Michael Cullum, Javier Nieto and Andres Rojas Guerrero reported the bug to Drupal and urge site owners and Drupal admins to upgrade Drupal 6.x to Drupal core 6.34 or 7.x to Drupal core 7.34. The vulnerability exposes user names in addition to threatening the availability of a Drupal site. The researchers said they were able to guess a valid Drupal user name by exploiting the bug by entering an overly long password; they give an example of a million-character password. They explain that Drupal only calculates a password hash for valid user names; by measuring the time it takes to get a response from the system with a long password, they can infer that the user name they tried is valid. “In Drupal, the way of calculating the password hash (SHA512 with a salt) by using phpass results in the CPU and memory resources being affected when really long passwords are provided,” the researchers wrote. “If we perform several log-in attempts by using a valid username at the same time with long passwords, that causes a denial of service in the server.” Depending on the server configuration—in this case Drupal 7.32 running on Apache with a MySQL default installation—the attack crashes the entire server. The researchers said this happens because the RAM and CPU limits are reached. It can also crash the database, they said. “If the Apache configuration is optimized and tuned to the hardware resources, we are able to reach all sessions available quickly and handle them for 30 seconds which performs a DOS without crashing the server or database,” the researchers said, adding that 30 seconds is the longest a script can run before it is terminated by a parser. “This helps prevent poorly written scripts from tying up the server.” The researchers said they will publish a proof of concept attack at a later time. This vulnerability was rated moderately critical by Drupal, unlike a much more serious SQL injection flaw that became public on Oct. 15. The flaw was found in a Drupal module designed to defend against SQL injection attacks. Attackers quickly wrote automated exploits targeting the vulnerability; the attacks worked without the need for a Drupal account and left no trace. Drupal quickly released an advisory urging site admins to proceed as if every Drupal 7 site that was not patched within hours of the announcement were compromised. “Attackers may have created access points for themselves (sometimes called ‘backdoors’) in the database, code, files directory and other locations. Attackers could compromise other services on the server or escalate their access. Removing a compromised website’s backdoors is difficult because it is not possible to be certain all backdoors have been found,” Drupal said in a statement. The patch was made available on Oct. 15; the vulnerability was found in a database abstraction API that sanitized queries to prevent SQL injection. Source: http://threatpost.com/drupal-patches-denial-of-service-vulnerability-details-disclosed/109502

Original post:
Drupal Patches Denial of Service Vulnerability

Sophisticated Android-based botnet a danger to enterprise networks

A new, more sophisticated and more stealthy version of the NotCompatible Android Trojan continues to strengthen one of the most long-lived and advanced mobile botnets ever to exist (since mid-2012). …

View article:
Sophisticated Android-based botnet a danger to enterprise networks

Asian mobiles the DDOS threat of 2015, security mob says

Beware traffic from hacked Vietnam, India and Indonesia fondleslabs Vietnam, India and Indonesia will be the distributed denial of service volcanoes of next year due to the profieration of pwned mobiles, according to DDoS security bod Shawn Marck.…

More here:
Asian mobiles the DDOS threat of 2015, security mob says

Fasthosts outage blamed on DDoS attack

Fasthosts’ five-hour collapse today has been blamed on a Distributed Denial of Service attack and a security flaw spotted on its Windows 2003 shared web server kit. The company explained the torrid morning it had suffered in an emailed statement to The Register . Earlier today, after we reported that Fasthosts had gone titsup, Reg reader x2uk suggested that the firm had been targeted by hackers. “Some of our customers’ domains seem to have been shifted onto their DNS overnight which may mean something nefarious is afoot,” he told us. Fasthosts finally responded to our questions just as it was telling its biz customers on Twitter that the service was coming back to life. It said: As a result of a denial-of-service attack, Fasthosts shared hosting customers experienced a loss of DNS performance, and as a result, periods of website downtime. In accordance with its procedures, Fasthosts acted swiftly to resolve the root cause, and has now implemented measures to return the majority of its hosting customers back to full performance. We apologise for any disruption incurred by our customers this morning as a result of this issue. If any customer has outstanding issues, we ask that they contact our technical support team who will assist them. Incredibly, the company’s strife didn’t end there: it has also been battling a serious security hole in its Microsoft servers. Fasthosts said: As a result of our routine and extensive security monitoring, Fasthosts today identified a vulnerability specific to part of its Windows 2003 shared web server platform. The small affected proportion of our large hosting platform was immediately isolated, and work is being undertaken to investigate and fix the issue as swiftly as possible. As a precautionary measure, some shared hosting servers on this specific platform have been taken offline, resulting in a small proportion of our hosting customers experiencing downtime. All efforts are being focused on returning this platform to service. Fasthosts added that “the security of our customer data remains of paramount importance to us.” It claimed to have “excellent levels of security monitoring, systems and resources to keep our customers’ data safe from threats.” However, the company made no mention of compensation for businesses affected by Monday morning’s outage. “We apologise unreservedly for the inconvenience caused to those customers affected today, and we remain committed to providing the highest possible standards of service,” Fasthosts said. Source: http://www.theregister.co.uk/2014/11/17/fasthosts_outage_blamed_on_ddos_hack_attack_and_windows_2003_vuln/

Follow this link:
Fasthosts outage blamed on DDoS attack

Holy cow! Fasthosts outage blamed on DDoS hack attack AND Windows 2003 vuln

Monday, bloody Monday Fasthosts’ five-hour collapse today has been blamed on a Distributed Denial of Service attack and a security flaw spotted on its Windows 2003 shared web server kit.…

More:
Holy cow! Fasthosts outage blamed on DDoS hack attack AND Windows 2003 vuln