Category Archives: DDoS Vendors

BLAM, BLAM, BLAM… nooooo! Hacker crew Lizard Squad spits DDoS venom on Call of Duty

JUST before you blasted 2 ‘copters with 1 rocket launcher Hackers from the group Lizard Squad have reneged on their promise to quit earlier this month, apparently launching distributed denial-of-service (DDoS) attacks on major gaming industry websites.…

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BLAM, BLAM, BLAM… nooooo! Hacker crew Lizard Squad spits DDoS venom on Call of Duty

Hackers Target Destiny and Call of Duty Servers with DDoS Attack

This past weekend, several servers for Destiny went down, both on PlayStation and Xbox, following a DDoS attack. Players were booted from the servers in the middle of the game and an error message read “Cattle” on the disconnect screen. The Lizard Squad hacker group claimed responsibility for sporadic DDoS attacks on the Destiny and Call of Duty: Ghost servers. They posted about their endeavors on their Twtiter account, bragging about taking down parts of both servers. Access has since been restored and players can once more return to their games. Understandably, players had been quite upset about their game time being cut short, especially during a weekend, and many have threatened to ask for their money back, thinking that it was a technical issue from Bungie. “Destiny is currently experiencing issues matchmaking and login across all platforms. We are actively investigating this issue,” Bungie wrote on Twitter, although the message was later deleted by the company. The attack comes after another one from August, when the PlayStation Network, Battle.net, and other online games have been targeted. It’s also when the flight carrying John Smedley, the Sony Online Entertainment president, was grounded after the same hackers issued a bomb threat via Twitter. The attacks indicate that the Lizard Squad hasn’t disbanded and ceased its activities, as it was rumored earlier this month. The group’s website continues to be down, however, for unknown reasons. Source: http://news.softpedia.com/news/Hackers-Target-Destiny-and-Call-of-Duty-Servers-with-DDoS-Attack-459494.shtml

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Hackers Target Destiny and Call of Duty Servers with DDoS Attack

The Escapist #GamerGate Forums Brought Down In DDoS Attack

Earlier this week, Milo Yiannopoulos of Breitbart London published an article containing emails between a group of video game journalists, all members of an email list called GameJournoPros. The Breitbart piece suggested collusion between these journalists to provide a specific spin on news during the early days of the Zoe Quinn scandal, which has now blossomed into the broader #GamerGate movement, and to clamp down on discussion of the topic across sites and forums. Yiannopolous also published the full exchange of emails, which provided a more nuanced look at the situation. In the emails various game writers discuss the Quinn scandal and how to approach it. Some suggest sending a note of solidarity, while others push back against this idea, citing the need for professional distance between journalists and their subjects. All told, it appears to be a largely civil conversation between professionals. But two moments in the thread ought to raise eyebrows. In one, writer Ryan Smith asks questions about where other writers and publications draw the line on writing about the private lives of subjects. He is quickly shouted down. More important is an exchange between Polygon writer Ben Kuchera and The Escapist’s Editor-in-Chief Greg Tito. Kuchera urges Tito to shut down The Escapist forum where the discussion of Quinn was occurring, but Tito refuses, arguing that a place for discussion is a healthy thing. “The conversation may be distasteful to some of us,” Tito writes in response to Kuchera and others, “but I don’t know if the answer is to delete the thread. The Escapist is not giving harassment a home, but allowing civil discussion on a matter that people are emotional about.” Since these emails took place, #GamerGate has been born and even the release of Bungie’s popular video game  Destiny hasn’t dampened the voices on both sides. However, it appears that many forums where discussion of #GamerGate has been occurring have been clamping down. Both reddit and 4chan have been banning users and shutting down forums related to the topic. One of the only places outside of Twitter where any discussion has been occurring has been at The Escapist. This morning The Escapist came under a DDoS (denial of service) attack, according to the co-founder and GM of the site Alexander Macris. “A DDOS attack is currently underway against @TheEscapistMag. The attackers are specifically targeting the GamerGate forum thread,” Macris tweeted this morning. After a brief interlude the attacks began again, and eventually the publication was forced to take down the forums temporarily. The attack consists of “a large number of IP addresses targeted the GamerGate thread for reload many times per second.” At this point there is no information of the perpetrator of the attack though The Escapist is working to find out. The timing of the attack, following the revelations in the GameJournoPros emails, does raise questions. We will continue to follow this story and update as more information comes to light. If anyone has information about the attacks please don’t hesitate to reach out. Source: http://www.forbes.com/sites/erikkain/2014/09/20/the-escapist-forums-brought-down-in-ddos-attack/

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The Escapist #GamerGate Forums Brought Down In DDoS Attack

Japanese Teen Sent to Prosecutors over DDoS Attack

Japanese police sent papers on a 16-year-old boy to public prosecutors Thursday over a suspected distributed denial of service (DDoS) attack on an online game company. It was the first criminal accusation by police in the country against a DDoS attack, which entails saturating a particular server or computer with large amounts of data, according to Tokyo’s Metropolitan Police Department. The high school student in the southwestern city of Kumamoto has admitted the charges, sources familiar with police investigations said. He told investigators that he was frustrated after the game company froze his game account and that he had a lot of fun to make numerous attacks, according to the sources. He is suspected of carrying out similar attacks on two other companies as well, the sources said. Source: http://jen.jiji.com/jc/i?g=eco&k=2014091800573

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Japanese Teen Sent to Prosecutors over DDoS Attack

DDoS Attack on Russia Today News Website

The RT news website has undergone the most powerful Distributed Denial of Service (DDoS) attack in its history, the press service of the channel reported Wednesday. “Thanks to the website’s reliable technical protection, RT.com was unavailable just for a few minutes,” the statement reads. According to the channel’s press service, RT.com has been repeatedly subjected to DDoS-attacks. One of the most powerful hacker attacks occurred on February 18, 2013. The website was unavailable for about 6 hours. In 2012 the channel’s English and Spanish websites also came under attack. The attack was claimed by anti-WikiLeaks hacker group AntiLeaks. A DDoS-attack is an attempt to make an online service unavailable by overwhelming it with traffic from multiple sources. The RT network’s first channel was launched in December 2005 and now consists of three global news channels broadcasting in English, Spanish and Arabic. RT has 22 bureaus in 19 countries and territories. RT reaches over 644 million people in more than 100 countries. Source: http://en.ria.ru/society/20140918/193035597/Hackers-Attack-RT-News-Website.html

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DDoS Attack on Russia Today News Website

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Silk Road 2.0 Hit by ‘Sophisticated’ DDoS Attack

Online black market Silk Road 2.0 experienced a distributed denial-of-service (DDoS) attack last week, which forced the site’s administrators to temporarily suspend services. News of the attack broke on bitcoin forums hours after it started, with the Silk Road team soon confirming the news via its own forums. For reasons that are less clear, black market Agora has faced outage issues problems of its own in the last few days. Silk Road remains defiant Silk Road 2.0 moderator ‘Defcon’ issued a statement saying that the site was facing a “very sophisticated” DDoS attack using the most advanced methods the site has experienced to date. The moderator said: “The dev team is working around the clock to get marketplace service restored, as well as watch the security of our systems closely. Much of the downtime you have seen is intentional on our part: if this is an attempt to locate our servers through packet analysis, we do not want to make it easy for our adversary and would rather be offline while we adapt our defences.” As the attack continued, Silk Road 2.0 remained offline. Defcon eventually issued a second update, indicating that the team is trying out different approaches to blocking the inbound DDoS. He stressed that the site is still processing withdrawals, although these have been delayed by the attacks. Silk Road 2.0 is aware that cashflow is very important and the site is therefore prioritising delayed withdrawals, the moderator added. Defcon ended the update on a defiant note: “To our adversaries: you cannot stop us. We will overcome every attack.” Questions persist Silk Road 2.0 vendors started reporting problems earlier last week, before the site was finally forced to shut down. Despite official updates, the outage prompted a number vendors to raise questions about the impact of the attack. Silk Road 2.0 was targeted by hackers in the past: last February, the site lost 4,476 BTC to an alleged hack, worth over $2.6m at the time. The attack was blamed on a transaction malleability exploit used by one of the vendors. The site decided to compensate affected customers and, by late May, it said more than 80% of bitcoins stolen in the alleged heist have been repaid to the victims. The source and goal of the latest attack remains unclear. Speculation is mounting that the attack was in fact launched by law enforcement in an attempt to ascertain the location of Silk Road 2.0 servers, while other users believe the attack was launched by criminals or competitors. Following the February hack, Silk Road 2.0 said it would introduce a multi-signature wallet system to replace its previous escrow platform. A multisig system should be less vulnerable to hackers, but has not been fully implemented yet. Online black market Agora faces outage Silk Road 2.0 is not the only black market suffering outage issues. While Silk Road 2.0 was struggling to restore services, which it eventually did late on Friday, competing market Agora went offline. Agora users started reporting intermittent problems on Saturday. The site was out of action over  much of the weekend and had still not become available by press time  (12:15 BST, Monday). The reason for the outage remains unclear. Earlier this month, Agora confirmed that it was suffering from availability issues on a regular basis. However, the team offered an extensive explanation into the inner workings of the market and the need for security, saying it considers that more important than around-the-clock availability. The Agora team said at the time: “Our primary goal is to stay hidden from law enforcement agencies and secure from hackers. We implement much more security measures than many others, which causes problems with availability.”   Source: http://www.coindesk.com/silk-road-2-0-shrugs-sophisticated-ddos-attack/

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Silk Road 2.0 Hit by ‘Sophisticated’ DDoS Attack

5 most targeted industries for DDoS attacks

1. Gaming Gaming is the most-targeted industry, according to the report, accounting for more than 45% of total attacks. The industry, which includes any company related to online gaming or gaming-related content, is prone to attacks by motivated players seeking to gain a competitive advantage or by malicious actors seeking to steal personal data from players. The industry received a large percentage of infrastructure layer attacks and a fair percentage of application-layer attacks in Q2, including 46% of all NYN floods and 68% of GET floods. 2. Software and technology The software and technology industry, which includes companies that provide solutions such as SaaS and cloud-based technologies, was hit with the second-greatest number of attacks (22%), and was the most-frequently targeted with infrastructure-layer attacks. The report reveals that the most popular attack vectors against the software and technology industry were DNS and NTP reflection and amplification attacks, accounting for 33% and 26% respectively. SYN floods made up approximately 22% of attacks, and UDP floods accounted for 27%. 3. Media and entertainment The report reveals that the media and entertainment industry accounted for a smaller percentage of all attacks, at 15% in Q2. This marks a 39% decrease from last quarter. Despite this shift, the media and entertainment industry remains one of the most targeted industries for hackers. These attacks often offer higher visibility for malicious actors, with press coverage that helps campaign organizers reach out to supporters and recruit new participants. The media and entertainment industry was hit by mostly infrastructure attacks, including SYN floods (18%), UDP floods (25%) and UDP fragments (22%). 4. Financial services Major financial institutions, such as banks and trading platforms, were targeted in 10% of all attacks in Q2, according to the Prolexic report. Historically, financial institutions have been the target of many DDoS attacks, including those orchestrated by the group Izz ad-Din al Qassam Cyber Fighters (QCF), using the Brobot botnet. The report discloses that recent activity indicates a possible resurgence of the use of the Brobot botnet, but the financial sector did not experience many major attack campaigns this quarter. 5. Internet and telecom Including companies that offer internet-related services such as ISPs and CNDs, the internet and telecom industry was the fifth most-targeted industry in Q2, accounting for 4% of all attacks. Infrastructure-layer attack vectors were the most common, with 10% of all attacks as UPD floods, and 9% as UPD fragments. Internet and telecom was the target of 12% of all NTP flood attacks this quarter. Source: http://www.propertycasualty360.com/2014/09/12/5-most-targeted-industries-for-ddos-attacks?t=tech-management&page=6

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5 most targeted industries for DDoS attacks

Use home networking kit? DDoS bot is BACK… and it has EVOLVED

OMG, it reconfigures your firewall… SAVE yourselves, Linux lords A router-to-router bot first detected two years ago has evolved – and now has the capability to reconfigure the firewalls of its victims.…

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Use home networking kit? DDoS bot is BACK… and it has EVOLVED

DDoS reflection/amplification attacks disrupting ISP networks

Attacks being used by gamers to settle disputes and by people with rudimentary hacking skills to target companies Reflection/amplification distributed denial of service (DDoS) attacks have now become so large that entire ISP networks are getting disrupted, says a networking security expert. Arbor Networks senior security engineering & response team (ASERT) analyst Roland Dobbins told Computerworld Australia that DDoS attacks are being used by gamers to settle disputes and by people with rudimentary hacking skills to target companies. “The main characteristic of these attacks is that they are huge. The biggest one we have seen so far was 400Gb/s. Because these attacks are so large, they fill up the pipes of Internet service providers [ISPs], the peering and transit links,” he said. According to Dobbins, the attacks are possible because many ISPs and enterprise networks have not implemented universal anti spoofing measures. “The way these [DDoS] attacks work is that the attacker will try to get control of a computer on a network that does not enforce IP source validation. [The attacker] spoofs the IP address of his target and sends a bunch of queries to a misconfigured server.” The misconfigured server answers these queries and “pummels” the target of the attack with unsolicited responses, he said. “It’s as if I called up 20 pizza parlours in Sydney, pretended to be someone else and ordered a lot of large pizzas to be delivered to that person.” The largest reflection/amplification DDoS attack recorded in Australia by Arbor Networks staff was 62Gb/s, he said. The attack, which took place in early 2014, appeared to be triggered by an online gaming dispute. “Since October 2013, there has been an explosion in these attacks that online gamers use. One player gets a grudge against another and decides to be unsportsman like and resort to a DDoS attack. It’s like using a nuclear weapon to solve a playground dispute,” he said. Dobbins had three tips for ISPs to avoid reflection/amplification DDoS attacks. The first was that ISPs should enforce anti-spoofing or source address validation at the edges of their network. “The second thing they [ISPs] can do is make sure they utilise flow telemetry analysis from routers and switches. This provides real time visibility into network traffic. When these attack floods traverse their network, they can detect it and trace it back [to the source] immediately,” he said. “The third thing they need to do is implement reaction and mitigation mechanisms. One of these is called an intelligent DDoS mitigation system [IDMS].” “If they have these reaction and mitigation tools to deal with this attack traffic, they will be in a much better position to deal with these events and minimise disruption,” said Dobbins. Source: http://www.computerworld.com.au/article/554558/ddos-reflection-amplification-attacks-disrupting-isp-networks-analyst/

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DDoS reflection/amplification attacks disrupting ISP networks