Category Archives: DDoS Vendors

Mounties nab Canadian woman, 27, in webcam hack shenanigans bust

Nefarious pervert hacks parlour cameras for heavy petting pwnage The Royal Canadian Mounted Police has nabbed a Canadian woman believed to have originated a botnet which she used to recreationally terrorise victims.…

More:
Mounties nab Canadian woman, 27, in webcam hack shenanigans bust

Community college targeted ongoing DDoS attack

Walla Walla Community College is under cyberattack this week by what are believed to be foreign computers that have jammed the college’s Internet systems. Bill Storms, technology director, described it as akin to having too many cars on a freeway, causing delays and disruption to those wanting to connect to the college’s website. The type of attack is a distributed denial of service, or DDoS. They’re often the result of hundreds or even thousands of computers outside the U.S. that are programed with viruses that continually connect to and overload targeted servers. Storms said bandwidth monitors noticed the first spike of attacks on Sunday. To stop the attacks, college officials have had to periodically shut down the Web connection while providing alternative working Internet links to students and staff. The fix, so far, has only been temporary as the problem often returns the next day. “We think we have it under control in the afternoon. And we have a quiet period,” Storm said. “And then around 9 a.m. it all comes in again.” Walla Walla Community College may not be the only victim of the DDoS attack. Storm said he was informed that as many as 39 other state agencies have been the target of similar DDoS attacks. As for the reason for the attack, none was given to college officials. Storms noted campus operators did receive a number of unusual phone calls where the callers said that they were in control of the Internet. But no demands were made. “Some bizarre phone calls came in, and I don’t know whether to take them serious or not,” Storms said. State officials have been contacted and are aiding the college with the problem. Storms said they have idea how long the DDoS attack will last. Source: http://union-bulletin.com/news/2015/apr/30/community-college-targeted-ongoing-cyberattack/

Continued here:
Community college targeted ongoing DDoS attack

High volume DDoS attacks still persistent

Arbor Networks released global DDoS attack data that shows a continuation of extremely high volume attacks. In Q1 2015, there were 25 attacks larger than 100Gbps globally. In the past year, Arbor h…

Read the original post:
High volume DDoS attacks still persistent

DDoSsers use reflection amplification to crank up the volume to 100Gbps+

Ne’er-do-wells: ‘Hey.’ Dumb servers: ‘WHAT?’ Targets: ‘AAARGH’ DDoS attacks have grown in volume yet again with 25 attacks larger than 100Gbps globally in Q1 2015, according to the latest stats from DDoS mitigation firm Arbor Networks.…

See the original article here:
DDoSsers use reflection amplification to crank up the volume to 100Gbps+

DDoS attack brings down TRAI’s website

Indian telecom regulator TRAI’s official website was on Monday brought down by a hacker group called Anonymous India following the public release of email IDs from which the government body received responses regarding net neutrality. The group also warned TRAI of being hacked soon. “TRAI down! Fuck you http://trai.gov.in  for releasing email IDs publicly and helping spammers. You   will be hacked soon,” AnonOpsIndia tweeted. The group claimed to launch a DDoS (distributed denial-of-service) attack on the website to make it inaccessible. Slamming the government portal, the group posted: “#TRAI is so incompetent lol They have any clue how to tackle a DDoS?” “But just an alarm for whole #India. You trust incompetent #TRAI who don’t know how to deal with DDoS? Seriously sorry guys. Goodluck!,” it added. Taking a dig at the personnel at TRAI, it tweeted: “Somebody call ‘brilliant minds’ at TRAI and tell them to stop eating samosas and get back to work coz DDoS attack has stopped from here.” In a response to a Twitter user about the attack, Anonymous India said it was “just preventing spammers from accessing those Email IDs posted by Trai publicly.” It said that TRAI is incompetent in dealing with internet. “So those who still think that #TRAi can “handle” the Internet, we just proved you wrong.They just got trolled by bunch of kids.#Incompetence,” the hacker group tweeted. Following tweets suggesting the hacker group to stop their actions, Anonymous India did same. However, the group compalined that no action was taken on those email ids which were revealed. “Guys http://trai.gov.in  is back online and they still haven’t done anything about those Email IDs. You guys told us to stop. We did,” it tweeted. “So if you guys still think you can have a chat with incompetent #TRAi, go ahead. But WE ARE WATCHING!,” the group posted. Source: http://indiablooms.com/ibns_new/news-details/N/10099/hacker-group-brings-down-trai-s-website.html

View article:
DDoS attack brings down TRAI’s website

DDoS threat recognized by all members of the C-suite

The increasing number and size of DDoS attacks and their costly and devastating effects on brand perception have not passed unnoticed by North American businesses, most of which have heightened their …

Read More:
DDoS threat recognized by all members of the C-suite

The rise and rise of bad bots – little DDoS

Many will be familiar with the term bot, short for web-robot. Bots are essential for effective operation of the web: web-crawlers are a type of bot, automatically trawling sites looking for updates and making sure search engines know about new content. To this end, web site owners need to allow access to bots, but they can (and should) lay down rules. The standard here is to have a file associated with any web server called robots.txt that the owners of good bots should read and adhere too. However, not all bots are good; bad bots can just ignore the rules! Most will also have heard of botnets, arrays of compromised users devices and/or servers that have illicit background tasks running to send spam or generate high volumes of traffic that can bring web servers to their knees through DDoS (distributed denial of service) attacks. A Quocirca research report, Online Domain Maturity, published in 2014 and sponsored by Neustar (a provider of DDoS mitigation and web site protection/performance services), shows that the majority of organisations say they have either permanent or emergency DDoS protection in place, especially if they rely on websites to interact with consumers. However, Neustar’s own March 2015, EMEA DDoS Attacks and Protection Report, shows that in many cases organisations are still relying on intrusion prevention systems (IPS) or firewalls rather than custom DDoS protection. The report, which is based on interviews with 250 IT managers, shows that 7-10% of organisations believe they are being attacked at least once a week. Other research suggests the situation may actually be much worse than this, but IT managers are simply not aware of it. Corero (another DDoS protection vendor) shows in its Q4 2014 DDoS Trends and Analysis report, which uses actual data regarding observed attacks, that 73% last less than 5 minutes. Corero says these are specifically designed to be short lived and go unnoticed. This is a fine tuning of the so-called distraction attack. Arbor (yet another DDoS protection vendor) finds distraction to be the motivation for about 19-20% of attacks in its 2014 Worldwide Infrastructure Security Report. However, as with Neustar, this is based on what IT managers know, not what they do not know. The low level, sub-saturation, DDoS attacks, reported by Corero are designed to go unnoticed but disrupt IPS and firewalls for just long enough to perpetrate a more insidious targeted attack before anything has been noticed. Typically it takes an IT security team many minutes to observe and respond to a DDoS attack, especially if they are relying on an IPS. That might sound fast, but in network time it is eons; attackers can easily insert their actual attack during the short minutes of the distraction. So there is plenty of reason to put DDoS protection in place (other vendors include Akamai/Prolexic, Radware and DOSarrest ). However, that is not the end of the bot story. Cyber-criminals are increasingly using bots to perpetrate another whole series of attacks. This story starts with another, sometimes, legitimate and positive activity of bots – web scraping; the subject of a follow on blog – The rise and rise of bad bots – part 2 – beyond web scraping. Source: http://www.computerweekly.com/blogs/quocirca-insights/2015/04/the-rise-and-rise-of-bad-bots.html

Continued here:
The rise and rise of bad bots – little DDoS

Week in review: APT wars, 18-year-old bug endangers Windows users, and main sources of data breaches

Here's an overview of some of last week's most interesting news and articles: Simda botnet taken down in global operation The Simda botnet, believed to have infected more than 770,000 computers …

Read the original:
Week in review: APT wars, 18-year-old bug endangers Windows users, and main sources of data breaches

Namecheap DNS Under DDoS Attack

Namecheap DNS hosting is under a DDoS attack, as a result millions of websites are offline. The company issued a statement : We regret to let you know that we are experiencing a DDoS attack against our default DNS system v2. If your domain name(s) is using DNS system v2, it may not be resolving properly at the moment. Unfortunately, there is no current ETA for the issue, but we are doing our best to mitigate the attack and minimize its affect on the service. We will keep you updated on the progress. An update was later posted : Update @ 7:45 AM EDT | 11:45 AM GMT The attack is still ongoing, unfortunately. We are doing our best to mitigate the attack as soon as possible. Your patience and understanding are highly appreciated Source: https://www.shieldjournal.com/namecheap-dns-under-ddos-attack/  

Read this article:
Namecheap DNS Under DDoS Attack