Tag Archives: internet

FCC blames DDoS for weekend commentary lockout

Not down to people trying to file comments on issues rhyming with wetsuit balloty, it insists Problems faced by consumers hoping to submit comments to the Federal Communications Commission over the weekend were caused by a denial of service attack, the US government agency admits.…

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FCC blames DDoS for weekend commentary lockout

FCC blames DDoS for weekend web lockout

Not down to people trying to file comments on issues rhyming with wetsuit balloty, it insists Vid   Problems faced by consumers hoping to submit comments to the Federal Communications Commission over the weekend were caused by a denial of service attack, the US government agency admits.…

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FCC blames DDoS for weekend web lockout

Mysterious Hajime botnet has pwned 300,000 IoT devices

The Dark Knight of malware’s purpose remains unknown Hajime – the “vigilante” IoT worm that blocks rival botnets – has built up a compromised network of 300,000 malware-compromised devices, according to new figures from Kaspersky Lab.…

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Mysterious Hajime botnet has pwned 300,000 IoT devices

Blame the US, not China, for the recent surge in massive cyberattacks

The internet’s new scourge is hugely damaging global attacks that harness armies of routers, cameras, and other connected gadgets—the so-called Internet of Things (IoT)—to direct floods of traffic that can take down swaths of the network. The blame so far has largely fallen on the Chinese manufacturers who churn out devices with shoddy security on the cheap. But all those devices have to be plugged in somewhere for them to used maliciously. And American consumers are increasingly the ones plugging them in. Nearly a quarter of the internet addresses behind these distributed denial-of-service, or DDoS, attacks are located in the United States, newresearch from network services firm Akamai has found. Some 180,000 US IP addresses took part in DDoS attacks in the last quarter of 2016, it found—more than four times as many as addresses originating in China. Akamai’s findings are particularly notable because the armies of hacked devices that carry out DDoS attacks—such as those controlled by the Mirai malware—don’t bother covering their tracks. That means the IP addresses are far more likely to genuinely correspond to a location within a certain country, the report’s authors write. The findings also end an era of Chinese dominance in DDoS attacks. Over the previous year, China has accounted for the highest proportion of IP addresses taking part in such attacks globally. Now the US is the clear leader, accounting for 24% of such addresses. The UK and Germany are a distant second and third. (To be clear, though, wherever the attacking devices’ IP addresses are, the person controlling them could be located anywhere.) The huge number of devices taking part in DDoS attacks in the US means regulation there, and in Europe, could stem the flood of damaging traffic. Of course, IoT regulation is a thorny issue—essentially, no US federal agency really wants to take the problem on—and there remain technical questions over how to actually go about blocking the attacks. Still, it’s a lot clearer now that simply pointing the finger at China isn’t enough. Source: https://qz.com/912419/akamai-akam-report-a-quarter-of-ddos-ip-addresses-are-now-from-the-us/

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Blame the US, not China, for the recent surge in massive cyberattacks

Majority of DDoS Attacks in October-December 2016 Conducted From Germany, UK, US

According to reports, United States, the United Kingdom and Germany became the top three source countries for DDoS attacks in October-December 2016. MOSCOW (Sputnik) – The United States, the United Kingdom and Germany became the top three source countries for DDoS attacks in October-December 2016, an Internet company dubbed Akamai said in report Wednesday, adding that the overall number of attacks in 2016 increased by 4 percent compared to previous year. “The top three source countries for DDoS attacks were the U.S. (24%), the U.K. (10%), and Germany (7%). In the past year, China dominated the top 10 list of source countries. In Q4 2016, China dropped to the fourth position overall, with 6% of traffic,” the State of the Internet / Security Report said. Russia became the fifth country in the list, with 4.4 percent of attacks. “The average number of DDoS attacks remained steady this quarter [October-December 2016] at 30 per target, indicating that after the first attack, an organization has a high likelihood of experiencing another,” the report said. The study notes that the number of IP addresses, used for DDoS attacks, significantly increased in the last quarter of 2016. The report also provides data regarding attacks in January- September 2016, with China, the United States, Turkey and the United Kingdom being the top source countries for attacks. Source: https://sputniknews.com/world/201702151050711562-ddos-atacks-internet/

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Majority of DDoS Attacks in October-December 2016 Conducted From Germany, UK, US

University suffers DDoS attack after it’s schooled by own IoT devices

Infected vending machines and light bulbs teach establishment a lesson. A PLACE WHERE late stage teenagers go to drink and make arses of themselves has fallen victim to a denial of service (DDoS) attack of, essentially, it’s own making. Yeah, we are talking about a university. We do not know what university it is, but Verizon’s breach report for 2016 tells us that the mysterious educational establishment, probably in the US, was taken to its knees by a DDoS attack that was brought about by its own bloody Internet of Things (IoT) devices. It’s kinda like that Mirai thing, but on a much smaller, and more personally embarrassingly scale. We like to imagine that a connected toaster and a connected fridge had a fallout and that everything when bits up. According to Bleeping Computer, which has had a cheeky look at the Verizon report, it was a bit more pedestrian than that. “The DDoS attack was caused by an unnamed IoT malware strain that connected to the university’s smart devices, changed their default password, and then launched brute-force attacks to guess the admin credentials of nearby devices,” Verizon says as it explained that something fishy went down. “Hacked devices would start an abnormally high level of DNS lookups that flooded the university’s DNS server, which in turn resulted in the server dropping many DNS requests, including legitimate student traffic. The university’s IT team said that many of these rogue DNS requests were related to seafood-related domains.” The university has placed all IoT devices, such as light bulbs and vending machines, on its separate subnet, or perhaps in a bin. The security industry reckons that this is a signal of the kind of unprotected troubles to come. Naturally. “On the surface this appears to be more of a prank than a sophisticated denial of service attack. However, proving that largescale IoT takeovers are possible should be a wakeup call to those who manage networks rife with unsecure IoT devices,” said Stephen Gates, chief research intelligence analyst at NSFOCUS by way of introduction. “Municipal, Industrial, Commercial, and now Educational infrastructures are becoming more and more vulnerable, because organisations often carelessly deploy IoT without understanding the ramifications of weak IoT security. “In this case the damage appears to be limited, and only inconvenienced users on a campus network. Do the same to a transportation system, a chemical plant, a hospital complex, an E911 system, or an ISP, and the damage could be much, much greater.” Source: http://www.theinquirer.net/inquirer/news/3004579/university-suffers-ddos-attack-after-its-schooled-by-own-iot-devices#

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University suffers DDoS attack after it’s schooled by own IoT devices

The next generation of cyber attacks — PDoS, TDoS, and others

2016 was a landmark year in cyber security. The cyber landscape was rocked as Internet of Things (IoT) threats became a reality and unleashed the first 1TB DDoS attacks — the largest in history. Security experts had long warned of the potential of IoT attacks, and a number of other predictions also came true; Advanced Persistent Denial of Service (APDoS) attacks became standard, ransom attacks continued to grow and evolve and data protection agreements dominated privacy debates. So what’s coming in 2017? Well, for years there have been theories about how a cyber attack could cripple society in some way. So what would this look like, and how could it come to fruition in 2017? An attack type that has been largely ignored that could prove to be key in a major cyber attack is the Permanent Denial of Service (PDoS) attack. This attack type is unique as rather than collecting data or providing some on-going nefarious function its only aim is to completely prevent its target’s device from functioning. PDoS, or Phlashing PDoS, also known as “phlashing”, often damages its target to such an extent that replacement or reinstallation of hardware is usually required. Although the attack type itself has been around for some time now, but it’s easy to imagine how much damage they could do it today’s connected world, and therefore it could quickly gain momentum in 2017. For example, one method PDoS leverages to accomplish its damage is remote or physical administration on the management interface of the victim’s hardware, such as routers, printers, or other networking hardware. In the case of firmware attacks, the attacker may use vulnerabilities to replace a device’s basic software with a modified, corrupt, or defective firmware image. This “bricks” the device, rendering it unusable for its original purpose until it can be repaired or replaced. Other attacks include overloading the battery or power systems. We’ve already seen the potential harm that a PDoS attack could cause, when in November last year an attack on residential apartments in Finland targeted the building management system. The attack took the system offline by blocking its Internet connection, causing it to keep rebooting itself in order to reconnect. As a result, the system was unable to supply heating at a time when temperatures were below freezing. Fortunately, the facilities service company were able to relocate residents while the system was brought back online. You only have to consider devices like Samsung’s Note 7 to see the safety hazards that the devices we all carry around with us can potentially harbor. There have been numerous test cases of malware and bots overheating devices, causing them to physically distort or worse. These attacks, bundled into a cyber attack, could have devastating and lasting effects beyond what we commonly think about in the world of the “nuisance” DDoS attack. Another attack type that has flown under the radar is Telephony Denial of Service (TDoS). This attack type will likely rise in sophistication and become a key tool in cyber attackers’ arsenals, particularly those who are more interested in wreaking havoc than having financial gain as a motivator. The rise of the Darknet Just imagine an attacker with the ability to cut off communications during a crisis period. This would hinder first responders, exacerbate suffering and in some situations it could potentially increase loss of life. A physical attack, such as a terror attack, followed by a targeted TDoS attack on communication systems could be devastating. Like PDoS, TDoS has been around for some time but again, as we depend more and more on these connected systems the impact of a targeted attack becomes magnified. One prediction that has come true in the past few years is the rise of the Darknet. However, in 2017 it could go a step further and become a mainstream tool that almost anyone can use to launch attacks or manipulate data. The Darknet offers easy and affordable access to attacks that can terrorize or otherwise alter someone’s personal details for financial or other benefits. The scope of the Darknet is also reaching further than ever thanks to the huge increase in connected devices that the general public has at their disposal. Examples include the ability to rent compromised surveillance systems, access to legal information including lawyers’ emails and the ability to view and manipulate medical or educational records. 2017 could see a frightening scenario develop where the definitive source of who we are and how our details are recorded and accessed is unknown. Just imagine being in a job interview and your CV doesn’t match your online school records. Who will the potential employer trust? This analogy can be extended to numerous scenarios, but the common thread is that your online records require high security and fidelity in order for you to function properly in society. In light of that, one of the single most personalized acts of terror that can occur is a wide-scale loss, alteration or deletion of records — with no reconstitution capability. This should strike fear in us all. Source: https://betanews.com/2017/02/09/the-next-generation-of-cyber-attacks-pdos-tdos-and-others/

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The next generation of cyber attacks — PDoS, TDoS, and others

39% of businesses not ready to protect themselves against DDoS

Companies are not ready to protect themselves against DDoS, with four in ten (39%) businesses unclear about the most effective protection strategy to combat this type of attack, according to research from Kaspersky Lab. A lack of knowledge and protection is putting businesses at risk of grinding to a halt. DDoS attacks can quickly incapacitate a targeted business’s workflow, bringing business-critical processes to a stop. However, the research found that nearly a fifth (16%) of businesses are not protected from DDoS attacks at all, and half (49%) rely on built-in hardware for protection. This is not effective against the increasing number of large-scale attacks and ‘smart’ DDoS attacks which are hard to filter with standard methods. Large-scale cyberattacks are now commonplace, such as the recent attack on telecommunications provider StarHub, which faced a high-profile DDoS attack in October last year. Hackers are also showing a preference for DDoS attacks, with the proliferation of IoT devices today. As IoT devices have weak security protocols, they are easy targets for hackers to launch DDoS attacks from. As IoT devices are forecasted to hit 21 billion in 2020, each potential entry point into an organisation increases vulnerability to DDoS attacks. Many businesses are in fact aware that DDoS is a threat to them – of those that have anti-DDoS protection in place, a third (33%) said this was because risk assessments had identified DDoS as a potential problem, and one in five (18%) said they have been attacked in the past. For some, compliance, rather than awareness of the security threat, is the main driver, with almost half (43%) saying regulation is the reason they protect themselves. The problem for businesses is that, in many cases, they may assume they’re already protected. Almost half (40%) of the organizations surveyed fail to put measures in place because they think their Internet service provider will provide protection, and one in three (30%) think data center or infrastructure partners will protect them. This is also not always effective, because these organizations mostly protect businesses from large-scale or standard attacks, while ‘smart’ attacks, such as those using encryption or imitating user behavior, require an expert approach. Moreover, the survey found that a third (30%) fail to take action because they think they are unlikely to be targeted by DDoS attacks. Surprisingly, one in ten (12%) even admit to thinking that a small amount of downtime due to DDoS would not cause a major issue for the company. The reality is that any company can be targeted because such attacks are easy for cybercriminals to launch. What’s more, the potential cost to a victim can reach millions. “As we’ve seen with the recent attacks, DDoS is extremely disruptive, and on the rise,” says Kirill Ilganaev, Head of Kaspersky DDoS Protection at Kaspersky Lab. “When hackers launch a DDoS attack, the damage can be devastating for the business that’s being targeted because it disables a company’s online presence. As a result business workflow comes to a halt, mission-critical processes cannot be completed and reputations can be ruined. Online services and IT infrastructure are just too important to leave unguarded. That’s why specialized DDoS protection solution should be considered an essential part of any effective protection strategy in business today.” Source: http://www.networksasia.net/article/39-businesses-not-ready-protect-themselves-against-ddos.1486046674

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39% of businesses not ready to protect themselves against DDoS