Tag Archives: ddos

‘Anons’ cuffed by Australian Federal Police

Two arrested for attacks on Indonesian and Australian websites The Australian Federal Police (AFP) claim to have arrested two chaps who conducted defacement and denial of service attacks on Indonesian and Australian government websites while using the name and iconography of Anonymous.…

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‘Anons’ cuffed by Australian Federal Police

Dating Website Plenty Of Fish Hit By DDoS Attack

Add Plenty of Fish to the list of technology companies whose websites have come under DDoS attacks from unknown cybercriminals in recent days. The company says that it was the victim of a five-hour attack today that affected approximately 1 million users. Initially, the attacks took down the Plenty of Fish website, then later the company’s mobile apps on iPhone, iPad and Android. As per the usual M.O., the attacker first contacted the site to warn them of the impending DDoS at 6:45 AM PT, then the attack started at 8:13 AM PT where it continued for several hours, off and on. The company says it was only recently able to mitigate the flood, and is now fully up and running again. The attack was 40 Gigabits in size, which makes it larger than the attack which took Meetup.com offline for nearly five days last month – that attack was “only” 8 GBps, the company had said at the time. These DDoS attacks (distributed denial-of-service attacks) have become more powerful as of late, thanks to the way attackers are exploiting older internet protocols like Network Time Protocol, or NTP, to increase their size. That seems to be the case here, given the size of the attack that Plenty of Fish suffered. Other companies that have been attacked more recently include TypePad, Basecamp, Vimeo, Bit.ly, and as of this past weekend, marketing analytics software provider Moz, to name just a few. In Plenty of Fish’s case, the attacker demanded $2,000 to have them stop the attack. Want to know if your company is about to have a bad day? Look for an email like this: From: dalem leinda Date: Tue, May 20, 2014 at 12:09 PM Subject: Re: DDoS attack, warning If you feel ready to negotiate, I’m still here. For something around $2k, I will stop the current attack and I will not resume further attacks. The amount depends on how quickly you can make the payment. Source: http://techcrunch.com/2014/05/20/dating-website-plenty-of-fish-hit-by-ddos-attack/?ncid=rss

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Dating Website Plenty Of Fish Hit By DDoS Attack

DOSarrest Rolls Out Cloud Based Layer 7 Load Balancing

DOSarrest has begun offering a Cloud based Layer 7 local and global Load balancing solution to its DDoS protection services customer base. The Load balancing service is a fully managed solution, whereby customers can create pools of servers; a pool can be 1 or many servers and can be located in multiple locations. Load balancing types available include: Round Robin, IP Hash, least connections, weighted. Other options include: By Domain or Host Header, allows customers to direct our servers to pick-up and cache content based on the domain name or host header that is being requested by the visitor. By Resource, allows customers to direct our servers to pick-up and cache content based on the resource being requested by the visitor. Mydomain.com goes to one server(s) mydomain.com/images goes to another server(s) and/or location. The load balancing solution also can be used as Active/Active -All servers are is use Or Active/Passive -some servers are only used when one or more have a failure. Health checks are all part of the service to determine if a particular server or instance is active or not. Jag Bains, CTO at DOSarrest comments “I used to be in the hosting game and when I see the advantages of our cloud based solution over a hardware based solution, this is definitely the way to go.” Bains also adds “There is no capital required, no technical expertise is needed, no single point of failure, it’s able to handle 100?s of millions of requests and can be setup in 5 minutes…top that.” General Manager at DOSarrest, Mark Teolis states “It’s a natural add-on to our DDoS protection services, which already incorporates extensive caching of customers content, this way customers can leverage any combination and location of VPS’s, Instances, private cloud and dedicated servers. I can’t see why anyone would want to buy or manage a Load balancing device again, it just doesn’t make sense anymore.” Details on this service can be found here: www.dosarrest.com/solutions/load-balancing/

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DOSarrest Rolls Out Cloud Based Layer 7 Load Balancing

SNMP could be the future for DDoS attacks

DNS amplification and NTP reflection are two big buzz-terms in the modern world of distributed denial-of-service (DDoS) attacks, but when successful defensive measures force those wells to run dry, a lesser-used reflection attack vector, known as Simple Network Management Protocol (SNMP), could take the forefront. Johannes Ullrich, dean of research with the SANS Technology Institute, told SCMagazine.com in a Monday email correspondence that SNMP, a UDP-based protocol used to read and set the configurations of network devices, hasn’t posed as big a threat as DNS and NTP attacks because there are not as many reflectors available as there are for other protocols. Ullrich said that most network-connected devices support SNMP in some form and, in a Thursday post, opined that it could be the next go-to vector for attackers after he observed a DDoS reflection attack taking advantage of an unnamed video conferencing system that was exposing SNMP. In this instance, the attacker spoofed a SNMP request to appear to originate from 117.27.239.158, Ullrich said, explaining that the video conferencing system receives the request and then replies back to the IP address with a significant reply. An 87 byte “getBulkRequest” resulted in a return of 60,000 bytes of fragmented data, Ullrich wrote in the post, adding that the individual reporting the attack observed roughly five megabits per second of traffic. “The requests are pretty short, asking for a particular item, and the replies can be very large,” Ullrich said. “For example, SNMP can be used to query a switch for a list of all the devices connected to it. SNMP provides replies that can be larger than DNS or NTP replies.” As people improve configurations, effectively causing those DNS and NTP reflectors to dry up, SNMP could be the attack vector of choice, Ullrich said – a point that John Graham-Cumming, a programmer with CloudFlare, agreed with in a Monday email correspondence with SCMagazine.com. “I think that attackers will turn to SNMP once other attack methods are thwarted,” Graham-Cumming said. “At the moment it’s easy to use NTP and DNS for attacks, so there’s no need for SNMP.” To get a jumpstart defending against this DDoS vector, Graham-Cumming suggested that network operators limit access to the SNMP devices on their networks. Ullrich went so far as to say that SNMP devices should not be exposed to the internet at all. Both experts added that the “community string,” which serves as a password for accepting requests, should not be so obvious. Source: http://www.scmagazine.com/snmp-could-be-the-future-for-ddos-attacks/article/346799/

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SNMP could be the future for DDoS attacks

Linux distros get patching on terminal bug

Pseudo-terminal buffer bug from 2009 discovered Linux admins need to get busy patching, as a newly discovered bug has emerged in the kernel’s tty handling that can let local users create memory corruption leading to denial of service, unauthorised modification of data, and disclosure of information.…

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Linux distros get patching on terminal bug

5 People Arrested for Launching DDOS Attacks on Systems of Chinese Gaming Company

A total of five individuals have been arrested by Chinese authorities on suspicion of being behind distributed denial-of-service (DDOS) attacks launched against the systems of a Shanghai-based online gaming company. According to police in Shanghai ‘s Xuhui District, cited by Ecns.cn, the first suspect, surnamed Wu, was arrested in January, after the targeted company provided authorities with information needed to track him down. Wu told investigators that he had been hired by one of the targeted company’s competitors, an Internet firm based in the Henan Province operated by an individual called Tu. Tu’s firm offered not only online games, but also hacking services. The individuals he hired would hack into the systems of various organizations and use the hijacked computers to launch DDOS attacks against various targets. The attacks launched against the Shanghai online games company are said to have resulted in damage of close to 10 million Yuan ($1.6 million / €1.16 million). The attacks were aimed at the login page for an online game and prevented paying customers from accessing their accounts. Police detained Wu, Tu and three other individuals suspected of being responsible for the cyberattacks. The company operated by Tu is believed to be involved in other illegal activities as well, including hacking, distribution of obscene materials, and hosting illegal ads. Source: http://news.softpedia.com/news/5-People-Arrested-for-Launching-DDOS-Attacks-on-Systems-of-Chinese-Gaming-Company-441863.shtml

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5 People Arrested for Launching DDOS Attacks on Systems of Chinese Gaming Company

Point DNS blitzed by mystery DDoS attack assault

Domain hosts Point DNS has been hammered with a high intensity DDoS attack on Friday, knocking servers out for hours. The size of the attack and techniques used – much less who might be behind the attack – remains unclear. Several Reg readers got in touch to notify us about the issue and the company confirmed the attack online. “We’re experiencing a DDoS attack on all DNS servers we are working hard mitigate the attack,” Point DNS said in a update to its Twitter profile. “We’re still working through a massive DDoS. We’re adding more nameservers and working with our network providers,” it added. The firm, whose services are used by more than 220,000 domains, was badly affected by the attack. This had a knock-on effect on firms who used its services – while websites were up and running as normal attempts to reach them by typing in a name to a browser would not resolve as normal. The snafu also means email won’t be delivered as normal to affected sites, with early indications suggesting clients clustered in Asia and Europe were worst affected. Security specialists Incapsula spotted a similar attack, which peaked at 25 million packets per second. It reported seeing floods of non-spoofed IP data coming from two DDoS protection services as the cause of the outage. “DNS flood have been around for a while but now the modern high-capacity servers take the attack to a new level,” Incapsula product evangelist Igal Zeifman told El Reg in a statement. “Unlike amplification attacks, that could be easily spotted and filtered on-edge, DNS flood queries can’t be dismissed before they could be allowed to be processed by the server. With powerful botnet machines pumping millions of malicious request each second, and aiming them directly and the most vulnerable server resources (eg CPU), the old threat is now making a comeback in a very dangerous manner.” Source: http://www.theregister.co.uk/2014/05/09/point_dns_ddos/

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Point DNS blitzed by mystery DDoS attack assault

DDoS attacks: half of targeted firms get hit again

Two new reports reveal that DDoS attacks are not only getting bigger- now logged between 250 and 325 Gbps, but that these attacks often target the same organisation more than once. The business challenge presented by DDoS attacks hit the spotlight once again this morning, after a research analytics firm revealed that 35 per cent more firms were hit by attacks during 2013 than in 2012 – and with 28 per cent of logged attacks seen last years lasting two days or more.   The most revealing takeout from the Neustar analysis – the firm’s second annual report, entitled `DDoS Attacks & Impact Report – 2014: The Danger Deepens’ – is that once attacked, there is an estimated 69 percent chance of a repeat attack.   And whilst 31 per cent of these companies were DDoS-attacked once, over 48 percent said they had been targeted between two to 10 times.   Neustar’s figures confirm Arbor Networks’ report – released last week – which saw a record 325 Gbps attack hit a French organisation earlier this year, with a massive spike logged by the research division of the DDoS remediation firm on the first quarter of this year.   Arbor says that it 72 attacks larger than 100 Gbps in size and volume, as well as 50 percent more attacks in the first quarter of 2014 than the entirety of 2013.   Back at Neustar, the research company claims that 32 percent companies hit by a DDoS attack last year estimated the events had cost them more than £240,000 per day during the outage. Additionally, the reports notes larger DDoS attacks are becoming more frequent with a 200 percent increase in attacks affecting bandwidth of between 1 and 20 Gbps.   For its research, Neustar took in response from 331 companies in the UK, across a range of public and private sector organisations. The company says its results show that DDoS attacks disrupt multiple business units – with public-facing areas like call centres, customer service and marketing operations absorbing more than 40 per cent of DDoS-attack related costs.   This high cost may because these business functions are key revenue earners in most commercial companies, SCMagazineUK.com notes, but the report also cautions that DDoS attacks are now being used as smokescreens for other attacks – an attack vector that security researcher Brian Krebs has reported on several times over the last 12 months.   Rodney Joffe, Neustar’s senior VP and technology fellow, said that organisations must remain constantly vigilant and abreast of the latest threats.   “As an example, Neustar’s UltraDNS network suffered an attack just last week peaking at over 250 Gbps – a massive attack by industry standards. Even with proper mitigations in place, the attack caused an upstream ripple. It is a constantly changing threat landscape,”he noted.   According to Mark Teolis, general manager with DOSarrest, a DDoS remediation specialist, the key problem with the latest generation of attacks is not just the volume and bandwidth used, but their general sophistication, with Layer 7 attacks now being seen in the mainstream.   Layer 7 is the highest of the seven IP layers defined under the OSI (Open System Interconnection) model and represents the application layer – the location on the computing resource where data both originates and returns.   Speaking with SCMagazineUK.com last week at the Infosecurity Europe show, Teolis said his firm’s latest software has been enhanced to deal with these latest Layer 7 attacks, by combining IDS (intrusion detection systems), load balancing, WAF (web application firewall) and DDoS mitigation under a single IT umbrella.   Using an IDS, he explained, allows security professionals to pinpoint sophisticated layer 7 attacks, as well as provide cloud based WAF services.   “Using these approaches – coupled with spreading the load across multiple cloud resources – significantly mitigates the effects of even the highest volume DDoS attack,” he said.   Keith Bird, UK managing director with Check Point, told SCMagazineUK.com that DDoS attacks have been used as a hacktivist weapon for several years – and, as this research illustrates, now the net is widening to businesses at large.   “We are seeing smokescreen-type attacks, and also more complex, multi-vector attacks on Web sites that combine DDoS with account tampering and fraud attempts,” he said adding, that, whilst these are difficult to defend against, firms should consider contingency and remediation plans in the event of such attacks. Source: http://www.scmagazineuk.com/ddos-attacks-half-of-targeted-firms-get-hit-again/article/345878/

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DDoS attacks: half of targeted firms get hit again

Majority of UK firms unprepared for DDoS attacks, study finds

New research released by Neustar suggests that the majority of UK businesses are unprepared to cope with the threat of DDoS attacks. Distributed Denial of Service (DDoS) attacks are a common method for cyberattacks to disrupt an online businesses. A DDoS attack uses compromised computer systems to attack a single target, sending traffic from multiple points of origin in a flow, which often overwhelms a system, causing it to deny authentic traffic access to services. According to research released by Neustar, a third of UK businesses estimate losses of £240,000 per day when hit with DDoS attacks. After surveying 331 companies in the United Kingdom across numerous industries including financial services, technology, and the public sector, the analytics provider says larger DDoS attacks are becoming more frequent with a 200 percent increase in attacks affecting bandwidth between 1-20Gbps, in addition to a significant increase in attacks on bandwidth with a magnitude of 100Gbps or more. Neustar’s report, “ United Kingdom DDoS Attacks & Impact Report. 2014: The Danger Deepens ,” also states that DDoS attacks are a “growing threat to organisations with potentially calamitous consequences for companies” without proper protection. Not only can DDoS attacks have an immediate impact on sales and business revenue, they can have long-lasting detrimental effects on brand value, customer trust, and public reputation. Key findings from the survey include: DDoS attacks often disrupt multiple business units, with public-facing areas like call centres, customer service, and marketing absorbing over 40 percent of DDoS-attack related costs. Over 35 percent more UK companies were hit by DDoS attacks in 2013 compared with 2012. In 2013, there was an increased number of longer attacks, with 28 percent lasting up to two days or more. Once attacked, there is an estimated 69 percent chance of a repeat attack. While 31 percent of these companies were DDoS-attacked once, over 48 percent were targeted two to 10 times. In 2013, attacks requiring over six people to mitigate rose to 39 percent compared to 25 percent in 2012, a 56 percent increase. In addition, Neustar’s research highlights an increase in a trend dubbed “smokescreening.” These types of DDoS attacks are used by cybercriminals in order to divert IT department attention while malware and viruses are inserted within a business network, with the overall aim of stealing valuable data or funds. Rodney Joffe, Senior Vice President and Technology Fellow at Neustar commented: Organisations must remain constantly vigilant and abreast of the latest threats. As an example, Neustar’s UltraDNS network suffered an attack just last week peaking at over 250Gbps — a massive attack by industry standards. Even with proper mitigations in place, the attack caused an upstream ripple. It is a constantly changing threat landscape. In February, Web performance company CloudFlare reported the mitigation of a DDoS attack on a French website which reached a record-setting attack of at least 325Gbps, and a potential reach of 400Gbps. Source: http://www.zdnet.com/majority-of-uk-firms-unprepared-for-ddos-attacks-study-finds-7000029178/

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Majority of UK firms unprepared for DDoS attacks, study finds