Tag Archives: ddos

FBI probe into hack and DDoS attacks on banks

THE Federal Bureau of Investigation is probing a computer-hacking attack on JPMorgan Chase and as many as four other banks, in what people familiar with the probe described as a significant breach of corporate computer security. The timing and extent of the hacking attacks wasn’t immediately clear, though cybersecurity experts began probing the possible JPMorgan breach earlier this month, according to people familiar with the investigation. Source: http://www.theaustralian.com.au/business/wall-street-journal/fbi-probe-into-hack-attacks-on-banks/story-fnay3ubk-1227040501221?nk=a9c75ab55e6d5171cc79455c78c5564d#

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FBI probe into hack and DDoS attacks on banks

Anonymous Hacked Ferguson Police Servers and Launched a DDOS Attack

Police officers in Ferguson, Missouri have been forced to communicate via text message after Anonymous launched a DDOS attack against the city’s servers shutting them down, following the murder of Michael Brown. On top of that, private servers of the Ferguson police department were hacked to get personal information. Both peaceful and violent protests have taken place in response to the atrocity in Ferguson. Last Thursday, anonymous performed a DDoS attack on Ferguson servers. The attack was in reaction to the murder of 18 year old, Michael Brown, an African American teenager who was killed unjustly by white policemen. Law enforcement officials said recently that the FBI has taken an immense interest in the investigation of hacking attempts directed at the personal computers and online accounts of police officers who are part of the department responsible for the murder. CNN and other mainstream media outlets, in affiliation with three policeman, who’s names are undisclosed, have reported the police as victims of a ‘cyber attack’, suggesting that anonymous is to blame for the violent demonstrations that took place in Ferguson, avoiding the clear fact that the PD of Ferguson are responsible, and a reaction like this is to be expected in result to the killing of an innocent person. This is of no surprise that corporately funded news outlets would be hesitant to speak negatively of the police. In reality, despite the propaganda that the 1% will spew forth, it is organizations like Anonymous that are fighting for freedom, unrestricted by the fascist regulations of a fear-mongering governing body, we can fight for peace using whatever means possible. Source: http://anonopsofficial.blogspot.ca/2014/08/anonymous-hacked-ferguson-police.html

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Anonymous Hacked Ferguson Police Servers and Launched a DDOS Attack

DDoS attack downs Twitch on news of Amazon acquisition

Just hours after Amazon announced a $970m deal to acquire Twitch, the live video platform for gamers was taken offline temporarily by a distributed denial of service (DDoS) attack. Twitch is the latest in a string of online gaming platforms to be hit by DDoS attacks that have been linked to several groups, including Lizzard Squad, jihadist group Islamic State, and Anonymous. At the weekend, Sony’s PlayStation Network was knocked offline and several others experienced disruptions, including Microsoft’s Xbox Live and Blizzard’s Battle.net. DDoS attacks are commonly used by competitors or activists to take services offline using a variety of techniques that make services impossible to reach. The reason for the DDoS attack on Twitch is unknown, but industry pundits have speculated that it may be linked to concerns about the acquisition by Amazon. Commenting on the weekend disruptions, Dave Larson, CTO at Corero Network Security, said the drivers for launching DDoS attacks are far ranging and difficult to pinpoint in many cases. “Anyone can become a victim at any time and, as the attacks continue to become stronger, longer and more sophisticated, businesses that rely on their online web applications as a revenue source cannot become complacent,” he said. Larson said the latest DDoS attacks underscore the importance of including a DDoS first line of defence as a component of network security architecture. Lancope chief technology officer TK Keanini said that while DDoS was once a resource held by a few of the elite groups on the net, this method of attack is now available to anyone as it is offered as a service. “If you know where to look, and you have some crypto currency in hand, just point and shoot,” he said. According to Keanini, any business connected to the internet is likely to be targeted by a DDoS attack at some point. “But game networks have to work harder than most to remain secure as they are incredibly attractive targets. “Not only are they high profile, with any disruption making the news, but given all the in-game commerce, credit card and personal information is kept up to date and can be monetised by these cyber criminals,” he said. Source: http://www.computerweekly.com/news/2240227573/DDoS-attack-downs-Twitch-on-news-of-Amazon-acquisition

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DDoS attack downs Twitch on news of Amazon acquisition

PlayStation network back online after DDoS attack

Sony’s PlayStation and Entertainment networks are back online after they were forced offline by a distributed denial-of-service (DDoS) attack, the company said late Sunday. “People can now enjoy the services on their PlayStation devices,” Sony spokesman Sid Shuman wrote in a blog post “We have seen no evidence of any intrusion to the network and no evidence of any unauthorized access to users personal information,” he said, also offering apologies for any inconvenience caused. Sony was hit by a large scale DDoS attack which struck upstream traffic routes over which Sony has no control, affecting players’ ability to log in, Sony Online Entertainment President John Smedley wrote on Twitter on Sunday. DDoS attacks attempt to crash a network by sending large amounts of data to a service provider. A group calling itself the “Lizard Squad” claimed on Twitter to be behind the attack. It said that it had “planted the ISIS flag on @Sony’s servers,” referring to the militant group that occupies parts of Syria and Iraq. Earlier on Sunday, the group tweeted directly to American Airlines writing that it had “received reports” that a flight carrying Smedley “has explosives on board.” This appeared to be a way to aggravate Sony further. Smedley had tweeted earlier that his flight had been diverted for reasons that had to do with “something about security and our cargo.” The Boeing 757, with 179 passengers and six crew which left from Dallas-Fort Worth for San Diego was diverted to Phoenix due to a “a security-related issue” and landed safely, according to American Airlines. Source: http://www.cio-asia.com/resource/networking/playstation-network-back-online-after-ddos-attack/

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PlayStation network back online after DDoS attack

Hack skirmish grounded Sony exec’s flight after FAKE bomb scare

XBox and Battle.net networks also targeted by DDoSers As Distributed Denial of Service (DDoS) attacks hosed not only Playstation Network but also XBox and Battle.net networks, it has emerged that a fake bomb threat grounded US flight 362, while Sony Entertainment Online chief John Smedley was aboard the aircraft.…

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Hack skirmish grounded Sony exec’s flight after FAKE bomb scare

BBC goes titsup: iPlayer to News websites down – Auntie working to fix it

Did DDoS attack on Sony kick Beeb TV offline? Updated   The BBC’s web servers fell over today, taking down its online news and iPlayer services – but it’s unclear whether the outage relates to the significant Distributed Denial of Service attack hitting Sony’s gaming network right now.…

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BBC goes titsup: iPlayer to News websites down – Auntie working to fix it

DDoS extortion attacks on the rise

While digital ransom attacks come in various types and forms, Distributed Denial of Service (DDoS) attacks are top of the list of methods used by attackers to force money from targeted companies. So says Bryan Hamman, territory manager of Arbor Networks, who points out that in recent weeks, well-known names such as Evernote and Feedly have fallen victim to extortion attacks, but these companies are just the tip of the iceberg when it comes to this very lucrative criminal activity. InfoSecurity Magazine reports that this year the number of network time protocol amplification attacks increased 371.43%. The average peak DDoS attack volume increased a staggering 807.48%. The news aggregator Feedly said it had come under a DDoS attack from cyber criminals, which was preventing users from accessing its service. “Criminals are attacking Feedly with a distributed denial of service attack. The attacker is trying to extort money from us to make it stop. We refused to give in and are working with our network providers to mitigate the attack as best as we can,” said Feedly in a blog post. “‘Pay up or we’ll take your Web site down’, so goes the adage that usually accompanies ransom-based cyber-attacks,” says Hamman. According to Arbor’s ninth annual Worldwide Infrastructure Security Report, DDoS extortion attacks account for 15% of all DDoS attacks. While it may seem like a relatively small percentage, one must consider that as many as 10 000 DDoS attacks occur world-wide every day and the potential cost in damages and reputation can have a significant impact on a targeted organisation, Hamman points out. He explains that DDoS extortion attacks are generally volumetric, high bandwidth attacks launched with the aim of crashing a company’s Web site or server by bombarding it with packets, which originate from a large number of geographically distributed bots. The size of volumetric DDoS attacks continues to increase year on year, and they remain a major threat to enterprises and Internet service providers alike, he adds. “Traditionally, DDoS extortion attacks were used against online gambling sites, around major sporting events. Criminal gangs would initiate attacks that would bring the Web site down just before the event was to start, thus forcing the companies to choose between suffering a major loss in monetary and reputational terms or paying up. Increasingly, however, DDoS attacks are being used to extort money from all sorts of businesses and the reality is that no company should feel safe,” he says. So what is the right response when it comes to extortion demands? Hamman asks. “The answer is simple and always the same – not to give in. Organisations should under no circumstances agree to pay the ransom – it can set a dangerous precedent and encourage more attacks in the future; while it might make the pain go away in the short term, the long-term results are generally not worth it. “Declining to pay comes, of course, with severe consequences – as we saw from recent attacks on Feedly, who suffered from three separate waves of DDoS attacks. However, the company has now recovered from the attack and is operating as normal. Furthermore, it has been praised for its brave decision by the security community and even its own customers,” says Hamman. According to Hamman, many companies still rely on reactive measures such as router filters and firewalls, which are inefficient and not sophisticated enough to protect against organised cyber crime. Instead, he says, organisations need to invest in preventive, multi-layered mitigation, which includes on-premise and cloud protection, as well as allowing for co-operation with their ISP or hosting company. In addition, putting a mitigation strategy in place, should the worst happen, is of crucial importance – especially as only 17% of organisations globally feel they are fully prepared for a security incident. “By building defences, implementing plans ahead of time and refusing to give in, businesses needn’t feel threatened anymore – attackers wanting to make easy money will have to look elsewhere.” Source: http://www.itweb.co.za/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=136989:DDoS-extortion-attacks-on-the-rise&catid=265

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DDoS extortion attacks on the rise

Popcorn Time Hit By Massive DDoS Attack

A major fork of the popular Popcorn Time project is currently being subjected to a massive DDoS attack. The whole project has been hit, from the site hosting its source through to its CDN, API and DNS servers. The team tells TorrentFreak that the attack amounts to 10Gbps across their entire network. Every year sees periods when sites in the file-sharing sector are subjected to denial of service attacks. The attackers and their motives are often unknown and eventually the assaults pass away. Early in 2014 many torrent sites were hit, pushing some offline and forcing others to invest in mitigation technology. In May a torrent related host suffered similar problems. Today it’s the turn of the main open source Popcorn Time fork to face the wrath of attackers unknown. TorrentFreak spoke with members of the project including Ops manager XeonCore who told us that the attack is massive. “We are currently mitigating a large scale DDoS attack across our entire network. We are currently rerouting all traffic via some of our high bandwidth nodes and are working on imaging and getting our remaining servers back online to help deal with the load,” the team explain. The attack is project-wide with huge amounts of traffic hitting all parts of the network, starting with the site hosting the Popcorn Time source code. Attack on the source code site – 980Mbps Also under attack is the project’s CDN and API. The graph below shows one of the project’s servers located in France. The green shows the normal traffic from the API server, the blue represents the attack. Attack on the France API server – 931Mbps Not even the project’s DNS servers have remained untouched. At one point two of three DNS servers went down, with a third straining under almost 1Gbps of traffic. To be sure, a fourth DNS server was added to assist with the load. Attack on the Dutch DNS server – peaking at 880Mbps All told the whole network is being hit with almost 10Gbps of traffic, but the team is working hard to keep things operational. “We’ve added additional capacity. Our DNS servers are currently back up and running but there is still severe congestion around Europe and America. Almost 10Gbps across the entire network. Still working on mitigating. API is still online for most users!” they conclude. Nobody has yet claimed responsibility for the attack and it’s certainly possible things will remain that way. Only time will tell when the attack will subside, but the team are determined to keep their project online in the meantime. Source: http://torrentfreak.com/popcorn-time-hit-by-massive-ddos-attack-140814/?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+Torrentfreak+%28Torrentfreak%29

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Popcorn Time Hit By Massive DDoS Attack

RIA Novosti Website Hit by DDoS Attack

RIA Novosti’s website has fallen foul of a distributed denial-of-service (DDoS) attack by hackers, the agency’s IT specialists reported on Sunday. The mobile version of the website is currently inaccessible. Problems with the website’s full version were also reported for a short period of time. The agency’s terminal for clients has not been hampered. Unidentified hackers first attacked the website of InoSMI. When the attack was neutralized, they attempted to disrupt the work of RIA Novosti’s website. IT specialists are now working to eliminate the disruption that has caused by the attack. This is not the first cyber attack on the news agency. In May 2012, the RIA Novosti website was hit by a DDoS attack from some 2,500 IP-addresses. Another DDoS attack on the agency’s website was carried out in July 2013. Source: http://en.ria.ru/russia/20140803/191676816/RIA-Novosti-Website-Hit-by-Cyber-Attack.html

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RIA Novosti Website Hit by DDoS Attack

Looking at insider threats from the outside

Cybersecurity is a never-ending battle requiring around-the-clock attention. From malware to DDoS to APT attacks, front-line IT security teams are being constantly bombarded. With all this attention o…

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Looking at insider threats from the outside