Tag Archives: denial of service

‘Zombie’ network protocols become DDoS threats

Attackers won’t let RIPv1 rest in peace. Attackers continue to search for obsolete protocols that are no longer used but still running on networked computer systems in order to abuse them as denial of service amplifiers. Content delivery network firm Akamai’s PLXsert security team discovered that the routing information protocol version 1, introduced in 1988, was used in a denial of service attack against its customers in May this year. RIPv1 was designed for small networks in the early internet era. It broadcasts lists of routes and updates to devices listening for RIPv1 information. A small, 24-byte RIPv1 request with a forged source IP address can result in multiple, 504-byte response payloads, creating a large amount of unsolicited traffic directed towards victims’ networks and flooding them. Attackers were in particular looking for routers that contain large amounts of routes in the RIPv1 database, so as to maximise the traffic volumes and damage done to target networks. Internet luminaries disagree however as to how much of a threat RIPv1 represents. APNIC chief scientist Geoff Huston told iTnews  RIPv1 is late 80s technology that routes the now abandoned Class A/B/C network address structure. “I find it hard to think that RIPv1 is connected to the global internet and that there are enough of them out there to constitute a real threat,” Huston said. Finding even one site in 2015 that is running RIPv1 is “like discovering a Ford Model T on the streets still in working order,” Huston said. Director of architecture for internet performance company Dyn, Joe Abley, pointed out that the problem is not that operators use RIPv1 for routing, it’s that administrators leave RPv1 turned on. The protocol has been unsuitable for the past two decades because it doesn’t work with classless inter-domain routing. “Just because you no longer have any use for a protocol doesn’t mean you always remember to turn it off,” he told iTnews . “What is happening is that ancient systems that have been hidden in dark corners for decades are suddenly jumping out into the sunlight and running amok because someone realised they could provoke them into bad behaviour, from a distance.” He said there are end-systems connected to the internet that support the ancient routing protocol and which have it turned on by default. Old Sun Microsystems Solaris servers are examples of such systems that are now being abused as packet amplifiers in denial of service attacks. RIPv1 does not use authentication, leaving it wide open to anyone on the internet to connect to. The attack is not fundamentally different from reflection attacks using the domain name system, chargen, simple network management protocol, or any one of a variety of user datagram-based protocols, Abley said. “This attack is not new and special really, although the fact that it uses RIP certainly brings a roguish twinkle to this aged network administrator’s eye,” he said. It can however cause large traffic floods. “Akamai’s Prolexic team have seen attacks that delivered over 10 gigabit per second of traffic towards a single victim,” Abley said. “I wouldn’t categorise that as ‘not really a problem’, especially if I was the one on the receiving end.” Abley said as with most amplification attacks, “poking the bear from a great distance relies upon being able to fake the source address of the stick.” There would be fewer opportunities for this happen if network operators followed the advice in Internet Engineering Task Force best current practice documents such as BCP38, which details network ingress filtering and similar texts to protect their networks. Source: http://www.itnews.com.au/News/406090,zombie-network-protocols-become-ddos-threats.aspx#ixzz3eqpq5n9E

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‘Zombie’ network protocols become DDoS threats

Anonymous DDoS UAE banking websites

Several UAE banks were hit by a co-ordinated cyber attack, known in the trade as a distributed-denial-of-service (DDoS) attack, on Tuesday, crippling e-banking operations and websites, and leaving the unnamed institutions fearing further assaults, Arabian Business’ sister websiteITP.net has reported. German systems integrator Help AG, which played a central role in the clean-up for one of the victims, told the website that the DDoS attack, which has been linked to cyber group Anonymous, happened on the last day of the month as the attackers sought to wreak maximum disruption during the banks’ busiest period. Help AG cited “sources in the market” who report “widespread” incidents in the UAE financial sector. A DDoS attack uses tens, sometimes hundreds, of thousands of computers to synchronise a bombardment of packet-traffic on a server. In the absence of sophisticated mitigation solutions, servers can be brought down and services brought to a halt. “Picking the last day of a month is a very wise choice from the attackers, as it is a widely known fact that the last three days of a calendar month are the busiest ones in the financial industry, as a lot of money is changing hands in the form of salaries, mortgage and loan payments,” Nicolai Solling, director of technology services, Help AG, told ITP.net by email.   Help AG’s systems identified hundreds of thousands of packets per second sustained for a number of hours on one UAE-based financial services institution. The attacks, the company said, were “not sophisticated in form”, but “followed very much the usual pattern of Anonymous, meaning application-level depletion attempts”. “Typically this is in the form of ‘get’ requests on the Web layer, which then tries to exhaust the Web servers, unfortunately something that often is too easy to achieve,” Solling explained. Anonymous is a global movement with no clear leadership, although it has spawned specific cyber groups such as LulzSec that perform co-ordinated campaigns on high-profile targets. This week’s attack was part of what the group calls #OpArabia. At the time of writing, the group listed several targets in Saudi Arabia, Egypt and the UAE on justpaste.it. Help AG did not disclose the identity of any victims, but the National Bank of Abu Dhabi (NBAD) was featured prominently on the list. “Help AG has for a period been aware of a number of threats on the region posed from Anonymous,” Solling said. Source: https://en-maktoob.news.yahoo.com/anonymous-cyber-hackers-hit-uae-banking-websites-112413582.html

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Anonymous DDoS UAE banking websites

CSIS website goes down due to DDoS attack

The website for CSIS, the Canadian Security Intelligence Service, appears to have gone down again — less than 24 hours after a suspected rogue hacker took the site down in a so-called denial of service attack. The website for Canada’s spy agency went offline shortly after 9 a.m. ET Tuesday. While the cause is still unknown, when the website went down Monday night, sources told CTV’s Mercedes Stephenson that a rogue hacker who had previously launched attacks on several municipal and police websites, had claimed responsibility for the CSIS attack. A denial-of-service attack is not technically a hack into the site, but the attack does prevent Internet users from accessing the website. “Experts I’ve spoken to say it is very hard to stop this kind of attack,” Stephenson told CTV News Channel Tuesday morning. “The level of sophistication and the number of ways they are attacking one website at one time to send it offline is very hard to prevent.” She says sources tell her that the hacker isn’t attempting to steal information in these attacks. “This is all about trying to embarrass the government, intelligence agencies and the police,” she said. The hacker is trying to draw attention to the controversial Bill C-51, as well as the case of an Ottawa teen who was charged in an alleged “swatting” incident. The hacker believes the teen was framed, sources tell CTV. A spokesperson for the Ministry of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness, acknowledged in a statement Monday night that the CSIS website had gone “temporarily offline.” “No information has been breached. We are taking cybersecurity very seriously,” spokesperson Jean-Christophe de Le Rue said. The same hacker was previously connected to hacking group Anonymous, but appeared to be operating alone on Monday, sources said. The person believed to be responsible tweeted out several messages about the CSIS website Monday, including: “I’m deciding if I should let CSIS back online and hit another government website, or if I should keep it offline for a while.” Less than two weeks ago, several government websites — including ServiceCanada.gc.ca and Parl.gc.ca — were hit by a denial of service attack. Anonymous claimed responsibility. Source: http://www.ctvnews.ca/canada/csis-website-goes-down-again-1.2447166

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CSIS website goes down due to DDoS attack

Protests or profiteering? Whether it’s Anonymous, the Cyber Caliphate or Cyber Berkut, the hack remains the same

“Hacktivism” has been around since the Cult of the Dead Cow in the 1980s; only the names have changed. Where we once heard about Chaos Computer Club and the Legion of Doom, we now have high-profile examples like Anonymous, Anti-Sec and Lulzsec. This is not a comparison – 35 years ago it was mostly demonstrations and denials of service. Now, attacks have become exponentially more intrusive and destructive. With this escalation in damages comes a new name. Cyber terrorism is a term that the media has been using quite frequently. There have also been countless articles on the so-called Cyber Caliphate, Cyber Berkut, and even various disparate groups of “cyber freedom fighters” around the world. Is changing “hacktivism” to “terrorism” the government and media’s way of upping the ante on hacking? Indeed, what is the difference between hacktivism and cyber terrorism, if there is one? After all, they both seek out pretty much the same targets. They both have a singular purpose, in its simplest definition – to cause damage to an entity, organisation or group. So what sets these two categories of hackers apart? Is the answer in their motivation? Can we really view one as “good,” and the other “bad”, or is it simply a matter of personal opinion? Anonymous Anonymous is a loose association of activist networks that has an informal and decentralised leadership structure. Beginning in 2003, on the bulletin board 4Chan, Anonymous began to recruit and train young people interested in hacking for a cause. Throughout the years, they have run cyber attacks, mostly distributed denial of service (DDoS) attacks, against the financial, healthcare, education, religious organisations, oil, gas and energy industries – pretty much everything. They have also earned a spot on that distinguished list of attackers who have targeted consumer electronics giant Sony. Anonymous has really changed the nature of protesting. In 2013, Time magazine listed it as one of the top 100 influential “people” in the world. Supporters have called the group “freedom fighters” and even compared them to a digital Robin Hood. Others, however, consider them little more than cyber terrorists. In the public’s eye, it depends on their motivation, following and targets. The bottom line: This could either be a case of malicious activity masked by political motivation, or pure malicious activity. Cyber Berkut Cyber Berkut is a modern group of hacktivists and claims its name from the Ukrainian special police force “Berkut”, formed in the early 1990s. This pro-Russian group made a name for itself by conducting DDoS attacks against the Ukrainian government and Western corporate websites conducting business in the region. The group has also been known to penetrate companies and attempting to retrieve sensitive data. Following a heist, they would post on public-facing pastebin sites or their own non-English website, which includes a section called “BerkutLeaks”. Cyber Berkut was most recently credited for attacks against the Chancellor of the German Government, NATO, Polish websites and the Ukrainian Ministry of Defence. The group has been compared to Anonymous based on its methods of protest and political targets. Viewed as passionate about its targets, Cyber Berkut has a clear agenda. However, the group’s ideology in no way diminishes the amount of intended damage that might be inflicted on potential victims. Cyber Caliphate Cyber Caliphate, as the name implies, is a hacker group that associates with the Islamist terrorist group ISIS. It has attacked many different government and private industry entities, and claims responsibility for multiple website defacements and data breaches. The group has hacked various websites and social media accounts, including those of military spouses, US military command, Malaysia Airlines, Newsweek and more. Indeed, Cyber Caliphate is hungry for media attention. This raises the question: does Cyber Caliphate believe in its stated cause, or is this just opportunistic hacking under the cover of a cause for media attention? What if the group is just looking for fame and fortune? What if the group is not a group at all, but the work of one or two people collaborating with different contributors for specific targets? Motive doesn’t matter Is this really cyber terrorism, hacktivism or just another set of hackers trying to get famous by jumping on the media’s hot topic of the month? In some cases, it may seem romantic when people claim to be fighting for a cause – rather than more nefarious intent, or even just for a laugh. But the fact remains that cyber attacks are cyber attacks, whether they are motivated by politics, money or a distorted idea of fame. The key to fighting back – after ensuring that your organisation’s security is up to snuff – is threat intelligence. Threat intelligence gathering is the key to keeping up with the actions of these groups and their potential targets with impartial, straightforward news, gathered by specialists. Staying abreast of potential hacktivist attacks requires a proper investment in intelligence groups with the proper tools, people, processes and other resources to deliver up-to-date information. And not just about the groups, but the techniques they might be using. Information sharing among intelligence groups from different industries and countries also will help expedite the reverse engineering of malicious code and assist in the building of signature content and correlation logic that is deployed to our security technologies. So once attacks are observed globally, defences can be quickly built, detection logic integrated – and information disseminated to the security specialists on the front line who may be all that stands in the way of the kind of corporate meltdown that nearly sank Sony Pictures in December last year. Source: http://www.computing.co.uk/ctg/opinion/2414910/protests-or-profiteering-whether-its-anonymous-the-cyber-caliphate-or-cyber-berkut-the-hack-remains-the-same

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Protests or profiteering? Whether it’s Anonymous, the Cyber Caliphate or Cyber Berkut, the hack remains the same

Cost to launch DDoS attack from botnets for hire

Could you pass up a $40,000 return on a $20 investment? Odds are you couldn’t if you enjoy wreaking havoc on a business. New research released today by Incapsula shows distributed denial of service (DDoS) assaults continue to be expensive nuisances for online businesses — and that the attacks can be launched from botnets-for-hire for around $38 a month. A DDoS attack costs a business $40,000 per hour in terms of lost business opportunities, loss of consumer trust, data theft, intellectual property loss and more, Incapsula estimates. When you consider top attacks last for days and that half of all targets are repeatedly hit, it’s easy to see how quickly costs escalate. A Lot for a Little “What is most disconcerting is that many of these smaller assaults are launched from botnets-for-hire for just tens of dollars a month. This disproportion between attack cost and damage potential is the driving force behind DDoS intrusions for extortion and vandalism purposes,” the security firm noted in its 2015 DDoS Threat Landscape Report (registration required). Last year Incapsula reported a 240 percent increase in DDoS activity. This year, although DDoS activity is still rising, Incapsula highlighted shifts in the methods, length and types of attacks. Incapsula defines an attack as a persistent DDoS event against the same target (IP address or domain). It is preceded by a quiet (attack free) period of at least 10 minutes and succeeded by another such period of the same duration or longer. The study differentiates between network layer and application layer attacks. These definitions refer to the Open Systems Interconnection model (OSI Model), which conceptualizes the process of data transmission by segmenting packets into seven layers. Network layer attacks target the network and transport layers (OSI layers 3 and 4), while application layer attacks target OSI layer 7. The analysis is based on data from 1,572 network layer and 2,714 application layer DDoS attacks on websites using Imperva Incapsula services from March 1 through May 7. “Assaults against network infrastructures continue to grow in size and duration. Those aimed at applications are both long in duration and likely to be repetitive. The upshot for organizations of all sizes is that simply weathering the storm is no longer a viable strategy — the impact will be big, durable and likely recurring,” the report notes. On That Depressing Note Here are a few of the report’s key findings: Once a target, always a target: 20 percent of websites are attacked more than five times DDoS attacks can last a long time: While 71 percent of all network layer attacks last under three hours, more than 20 percent last more than five days Some attacks are exceptionally long: The longest attack was 64 days DDoS for hire is more readily available than ever: Botnet-for-hire fingerprints are on roughly 40 percent of all attacks Five countries create most DDoS botnet traffic : 56 percent of DDoS bot traffic emerged from China, Vietnam, US, Brazil and Thailand What’s a Botnet-for-Hire? Opportunistic cybercriminals have the botnet-for-hire business model, a subscription scheme that provides each user with limited access to the botnet resources (usually for a cumulative duration of no more than 60 minutes per month). “During these short periods, individuals with little or no DDoS skill are able to execute assaults using one of the few available scripts (which are reminiscent of our definition of attack vectors),” the report notes. The average cost to rent-a-botnet for an hour each month through a DDoS subscription package is around $38, with fees as low as $19.99. The takeaway: It costs very little to bring down a website. “Perhaps putting a price tag on the damage caused by such services will bring more public attention to their activity, and to the danger posed by the shady economy behind DDoS attacks,” the report notes. Source: http://www.cmswire.com/information-management/you-can-bring-down-a-website-for-38/

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Cost to launch DDoS attack from botnets for hire

Anonymous Knocks Pro-Nazi Websites Offline with DDoS Attacks

Anonymous hackers decided to commemorate the 70th anniversary of the defeat of Nazi forces in 1945, by Anonymous Sweden deciding to knock pro-Nazi websites offline in motion of the 70 year old victory. Hacktivists in Sweden took it upon themselves to celebrate the 70th anniversary of the victory over Nazi forces in Germany by knocking offline pro-Nazi affiliated domains hosted exclusively by Swedish companies. Targets were limited but extremely well known with well-over hundreds of thousands of monthly visitors. Specific targets included nordfront[dot]se and svenskarnasparti[dot]se, which were both taken offline by a large Distributed Denial of Service (DDoS) Attack and have been inaccessible for several days. The domains remain offline during the time of writing this article and were initially taken offline mid afternoon Friday. Depending on the size of the attack, the domains could remain offline and inaccessible for several days as they have been already. Anonymous Sweden announced their news on Pastebin, with a letter to pro-Nazi websites that were apart of their targeted attack, stating: Today it’s 70 years since nazi-Germany fell. But nazis is still marching in Europe.. Attacking peaceful protesters and spreading fear across the world. It is our duty to remember what happend and never let the horrors be forgotten.. It is our duty to fight nazism. Today we Will wipe the nazis of the webs! Main targets Www.nordfront.se Server info : Apache/2.2.22 (Debian) mod_fcgid/2.3.6 mod_ssl/2.2.22 OpenSSL/1.0.1e IP: 176.10.250.104 is their dotted decimal Www.svenskarnasparti.se Server info: its a worldpress site with cloudfare “Protection” We are Anonymous We do not forgive We do not forget Hitler-fan boys, its time to expect us! /Anonymous Sweden with friends! Special thanks to PH1K3 United as one divided by zero Anonymous started their attacks May 8th, and the domains are still offline nearly 48 hours later. The Swedish collective did not note any specific groups for taking part other than releasing the news via pastebin. We will keep you updated. Source: http://freedomhacker.net/anonymous-knocks-pro-nazi-websites-offline-ddos-attack-4106/

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Anonymous Knocks Pro-Nazi Websites Offline with DDoS Attacks

Hacker Group DD4BC New DDos Attacks

DD4BC Launches New Wave Of DDoS Attacks The extortionist group DD4BC is believed to be connected to a new wave of distributed denial of service (DDoS) attacks against organizations based in Australia, New Zealand, and Switzerland. The group is asking for 25 BTC from those affected in exchange for giving up the flood of inbound data that has resulted in the recipient sites becoming inaccessible. Recently, DD4BC was mentioned in a warning published by the Swiss Governmental Computer Emergency Response Team (GovCERT). GovCERT is a branch of MELANI, a national agency that deals with cyber security issues. The warning read: “In the past days MELANI / GovCERT.ch has received several requests regarding a distributed denial of service (DDoS) extortion campaign related to ‘DD4BC’.” As per the New Zealand government, the extortion attempts seemingly begin with a short DDoS attack that is meant to reflect the possible impact after the ransom demand has been made. DD4BC has been linked to previous attacks on digital currency websites and businesses. The attacks include extortion attempts made against various well-known mining pool operators. GovCERT confirmed that it had so far received reports from several high profile targets, stating that some of the organizations were the victims of a wave of DDoS attacks. DD4BC’s activity has been on the rise recently, with the new wave of attacks beginning at the start of March. “ While these attacks have targeted foreign organizations in the past months, we have seen an increase of activity of DD4BC in Europe recently. Since earlier this week, the DD4BC Team expanded their operation to Switzerland, ” stated GovCERT. GovCERT also asked those affected by the attacks to not pay the ransom. Rather the agency has advised victims to file a police report and seek additional mitigation support from their Internet service provider. The news of the New Zealand attacks became public at the start of May after the New Zealand National Cyber Security Centre (NCSC) issued a warning regarding DDoS attacks on local organizations. While the agency did not specify who the perpetrator behind the attacks was, it did confirm that an investigation into the attacks was ongoing. Barry Brailey, chairman of Cybersecurity nonprofit New Zealand Internet Task Force, confirmed the link between DD4BC and the recent DDoS attacks in New Zealand. “ Yes, [the series of attacks] appears to be linked to the group/moniker ‘DD4BC’, ” he said. Other companies who have fallen victim to the group include BitBay, BitQuick, Coin Telegraph, Expresscoin, and Bitalo- who created a 100 BTC bounty after it was attacked. Source: http://bitcoinvox.com/article/1674/hacker-group-dd4bc-new-ddos-attacks

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Hacker Group DD4BC New DDos Attacks

Dukascopy Server Crash on Wednesday Caused by DDoS Attack

The company has contracted a third party specializing in such threats in order to prevent further attacks from happening S wiss Dukascopy Bank was a target of a distributed denial-of-service (DDoS) attack yesterday, a company spokesperson shared with Finance Magnates’ reporters. The server crash prompted a number of the brokerage’s clients to take to social media in order to establish what the issues were with the website and the demo and real accounts servers of the firm. Additionally, the company detailed that the outage lasted an hour and thirteen minutes. A company spokesperson stated to Finance Magnates reporters, “As you may know yesterday starting from 12:31 GMT to 13:44 GMT Dukascopy servers were down due to a DD0S attack.” The DDoS attack was successfully mitigated and we expect that it will not be repeated “The DDoS attack was successfully mitigated and we expect that it will not be repeated. Protection measures have been implemented, including enabling third party services specializing on such kind of threats.” As stated above, the company has turned to a third party contractor in order to alleviate the risks associated with any further DDoS attack. Financial services institutions are frequent targets of DDoS attacks, however the companies most frequently suffering are banks or credit card payment gateways. In the earlier stages of online business, threats about DDoS attacks have been unlawfully used by some outfits to blackmail their competitors. Our reporters have heard about similar criminal practices remaining in play in more recent cases in the industry. Both binary options providers and brokers have been targets of similar attacks in recent years. As for Dukascopy, it is business as usual on the company’s platforms today, while the euro is hitting fresh 1-month highs against the U.S. dollar and the British pound. Source: http://www.financemagnates.com/forex/brokers/dukascopy-server-crash-on-wednesday-caused-by-ddos-attack/

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Dukascopy Server Crash on Wednesday Caused by DDoS Attack

DOSarrest External Monitoring Service launches iOS and Android App

VANCOUVER , April 8, 2015 /PRNewswire/ – DOSarrest Internet Security, a fully managed cloud based DDoS protection service, today announced that their DOSarrest External Monitoring Service (DEMS), a real-time website monitoring tool, launches a new iOS and Android application for clients. This application is a complimentary service to all DOSarrest clients who are subscribed to DOSarrest’s industry leading DDoS protection service. The new mobile application on iOS and Android will allow clients to easily access and view their website(s) status and performance in real-time 24/7/365, as well as enable them to historically view all of the statistics for up to 1 year from 8 globally distributed sensors. Jag Bains, CTO of DOSarrest says “This application is beneficial to all of our clients who have a mission critical website that requires 100% uptime. Unlike other monitoring services, this service is fully managed 24/7/365. Should anything unexpected occur, our engineers will investigate, pinpoint and advise the client on a solution in near real-time. No other vendor in this industry offers this level of customer service.” “We have a number of clients who depend on this service and some have subscribed to it that aren’t even using our DDoS protection service,” says Mark Teolis , CEO of DOSarrest. “With the new mobile application, in one click on your smart phone, you can view what sites are up or down and why in real-time, whenever and wherever you are. It’s like the laptop version in your pocket.” Teolis adds “As I far as I know, no other DDoS protection service or CDN offers any such complimentary service that compares to our External Monitoring Service, with 8 globally distributed sensors completely independent of any of our scrubbing nodes.” About DOSarrest Internet Security: DOSarrest founded in 2007 in Vancouver, B.C. , Canada , is one of only a couple of companies worldwide to specialize in cloud based DDoS protection services .  Additional Web security services offered are Cloud based W eb A pplication F irewall (WAF), V ulnerability T esting and O ptimization (VTO) as well as cloud based global load balancing. SOURCE: http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/dosarrest-external-monitoring-service-launches-ios-and-android-app-499026641.html

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DOSarrest External Monitoring Service launches iOS and Android App

Michigan High School Student Facing Charges After lauching DDoS attack on School Network

A student at Monroe High School in Monroe, Michigan, was recently caught conducting a distributed denial of service attack (DDoS), and Monroe Public Schools Superintendent Barry Martin says the district will be pressing charges. Over a period of two weeks, the unnamed student managed to take the network down for ten to fifteen minutes at a time during the school day. This had a heightened effect on the district, as modern-day high schools rely heavily on the Internet for administration as well as classroom instruction. “We are so reliant on the Internet that we can’t afford to have down time,” said Stephen McNew, the superintendent of the district in which the student attended school. No Sensitive Data Compromised Despite having success at being disruptive, an act that the student considered to be a prank, no sensitive documents, e-mails, or files were ever compromised, which should contribute greatly to his defense. Merely disrupting communications is far less of a crime than is stealing sensitive information about other students or private communications between staff members. “A Good Student” Barry Martin called the alleged hacker “a good student” in comments to the Monroe News but said that this act could not be tolerated, and charges would be filed. DDoS is a federal felony, but from the sounds of it, the FBI has not yet been involved in the case. It is taken very seriously when the targets are larger organizations or government institutions, and ordinarily those who are serious about conducting DDoS attacks are careful to cover their tracks. It is not yet evident how the student was found to be a suspect in the case, but in the town of roughly 20,000 people, the pool of likely suspects is rather slim. The profile would be a student with high grades and extreme computer aptitude. This would make the pool of likely suspects even smaller. The way that high schools often conduct such investigations, the student would have been brought in front of a police officer and interrogated until he confessed. Like as not, school officials would pretend to know already that he was guilty, and he would confess. Equally as likely, the student bragged about it to another student, who then turned him in. Another thing that the administrators said about the student was that he probably didn’t know the seriousness of what he was doing. This is in line with existing research that has concluded that adolescents are less likely to consider the consequences of their actions before taking them. Locals Have Mixed Feelings Many locals on the Monroe News Facebook page felt that a felony would be too stern a response for the gifted student’s prank. After all, in the end, the one thing he illustrated was that the school district had a weak network infrastructure that needs upgrading. Especially if, as administrators have said, they are extremely reliant on the Internet in daily teaching. Source: https://hacked.com/michigan-high-school-student-facing-charges-ddosing-school-network/

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Michigan High School Student Facing Charges After lauching DDoS attack on School Network