Tag Archives: denial of service

Teen nabbed after attacks on UK government and FBI sites

His lawyers claim that their client was only on the “periphery” of a conspiracy to take down UK government and FBI sites, but a UK teen who didn’t mind boasting online about those crimes now faces the possibility of jail time. Charlton Floate, 19, of Solihull, England, already admitted to three counts of computer misuse under the Computer Misuse Act and three counts of possessing prohibited images at Birmingham Crown Court. The attacks took place in January 2013, when Floate and a team of other cyber criminals crippled government sites with deluges of digital traffic sent from malware-infected computers. Such computers are often called zombie computers, and they’re widely used in botnets to gang up on sites with what’s known as a distributed denial of service (DDoS) attack. The gang managed to knock out the UK’s Home Office site – a heavily used site that provides information on passports and immigration among other things – for 83 minutes. The group also took down an FBI site – that allowed users to report crime – for over five hours. The prosecutor, Kevin Barry, reportedly said that in November 2012, Floate carried out two test runs, remotely attacking the computers of two men in the US. Floate uploaded a sexually explicit video to YouTube to “mock and shame” one of his victims, and he “taunted” the other victim about having control of his computer. Modest, he was not – Floate also reportedly bragged about the government site attacks on Twitter and on a forum frequented by hackers. Judicial officer John Steel QC rejected Floate’s legal team’s contention that he was on the “periphery” of the cyber gang, saying that evidence pointed to his actually being central to the crimes, including organizing the attacks. He said Floate was “clearly a highly intelligent young man”, who had become an expert in computer marketing, had written a book on the subject, and succeeded in taking down an FBI.gov website – what he called the “Holy Grail” of computer crime: A successful attack on the FBI.gov website is regarded by hackers as the Holy Grail of hacking. It was this which he attempted and, indeed, achieved. He was the person who instituted such attacks and assembled the tools and personnel for doing so. The Holy Grail it may be but in this case I beg to differ about how successful Floate was in getting his hands on it. A DDoS attack isn’t a form of sophisticated lock picking, it’s just a noisy way to board the door shut from the outside. Floate may well be bright but he stumbled once, and that’s all that investigators needed. Namely, he used his own IP address – he worked out of his mother’s home – to check up on how the attacks had gone. Police traced the address to Floate’s mother’s home, where they seized Floate’s computer and mobile phone. They also found evidence that he’d tried to recruit others into the gang and that he’d discussed possible weaknesses in certain websites as well as potential future targets – including the CIA and The White House. Sentencing was adjourned until 16 October, pending a psychiatric report. Floate is currently remanded on conditional bail. Steel said he hadn’t yet made up his mind about sentencing but added there’s “clearly potential for an immediate custodial sentence” and that Floate “should be mentally prepared for it.’ Source: https://nakedsecurity.sophos.com/2015/08/24/teen-nabbed-after-attacks-on-uk-government-and-fbi-sites/

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Teen nabbed after attacks on UK government and FBI sites

DDoS attacks rage on, primarily impacting U.S. and Chinese entities

Organizations in the U.S. and China should be especially aware of distributed denial-of-service (DDoS) attacks, as more than half of them in Q2 of this year were aimed at the two countries. Kaspersky Lab’s “DDoS Intelligence Report Q2 2015” found that from April until the end of June this year, DDoS attacks impacted 79 countries, with most, 77 percent, affecting only 10 countries. In addition to China and the U.S., South Korea, Canada, Russia and France accounted for a large portion of attacks. The cybersecurity company defined a single attack as an incident during which there was “no break in botnet activity lasting longer than 24 hours.” If the same entity was attacked by the same botnet but with a 24 hour gap in activity, the two incidents would be considered separat e. The longest attack recorded during this past quarter lasted 205 hours, or eight and a half days. The peak number of attacks clocked in at 1,960 on May 7, and the low, at 73 attacks, occurred on June 25. The popularity of these attacks stems from the ease with which they can be arranged, said Andrey Pozhogin, senior product marketing manager at Kaspersky Lab North America, in emailed comments to SCMagazine.com. “Today, it is much easier to launch a DDoS attack,” he wrote. “Suddenly, you don’t have to be an expert in the field – all the power and potential damage is available to you with a few clicks. It’s also relatively cheap to commission a DDoS attack.” He noted that some online services charge as little as $50 for an attack that can cause serious damage to a company’s reputation, as well as financial losses. An average DDoS attack can range in cost to a company, depending on its size, anywhere from $52,000 to $444,000, Pozhogin said. As far as days of the week to be attacked, Sunday was the most popular day, accounting for 16.6 percent of them, and Tuesday was the least popular with 12.1 percent. Even as companies attempt to beef up their protection, it’s nearly impossible to stay ahead of the attackers and their tools. “As long as a company continues to focus on its core business it will not be able to match the resources poured into bypassing outdated protection and staying ahead of the attackers,” Pozhogin said. That said, cybersecurity firms’ technology can assist in keeping attackers at bay and enterprises’ sites running, he reminded. Source: http://www.scmagazine.com/kaspersky-lab-releases-q2-ddos-report/article/431034/

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DDoS attacks rage on, primarily impacting U.S. and Chinese entities

Planned Parenthood websites downed in DDoS attack

Planned Parenthood websites have gone down and are, according to the main page, undergoing maintenance. In a statement emailed to SCMagazine.com on Thursday, Dawn Laguens, executive VP of Planned Parenthood, said that the Planned Parenthood websites were the target of a DDoS attack. “Today, the Planned Parenthood websites experienced a wide scale distributed denial-of-service (DDoS) attack, a hacker tactic to overwhelm websites with massive amounts of traffic to block any legitimate traffic from getting in,” Laguens said. The websites were back online shortly after the attack, but are scheduled to remain down throughout Thursday for security purposes, Laguens said, adding that during this time visitors are being redirected to the organization’s Facebook pages. Following reports that politically motivated attackers released website databases, Planned Parenthood announced on Monday that it is investigating possible unauthorized access to its systems. Source: http://www.scmagazine.com/planned-parenthood-websites-downed-in-ddos-attack/article/429563/

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Planned Parenthood websites downed in DDoS attack

New York Site DDoS attack After Massive Cosby Story Goes Online

At 9PM on Sunday night, New York Magazine published to the web one of its most ambitious and powerful stories of the year, an extended interview with 35 women who have accused Bill Cosby of sexual assault. Within minutes, writers and editors heaped praise on the feature, but later into the night, it mysteriously disappeared, along with everything else hosted at NYMag.com, victim to an apparent denial-of-service attack. On Twitter, accounts identifying themselves as the hackers gave a variety of conflicting and implausible explanations for the attack, ranging from general animosity toward New York City to a personal connection with one of the women involved. The magazine’s only official statement came at 3:32AM: “Our site is experiencing technical difficulties. We are aware of the issue, and working on a fix.” As of press time, the site is still offline. So far, the attack is consistent with a denial-of-service (or DDoS) attack — an unsophisticated flood of traffic that blocks users from accessing a specific address without compromising the site itself. DDoS attacks can be launched cheaply from nearly anywhere, making them a favored tactic for activists and criminals alike. Mitigation techniques have grown more advanced in recent years, but the sheer volume of requests is often enough to knock a site offline or slow response time for days at a time. Denial-of-service actions are occasionally used as cover for more sophisticated attacks, but the vast majority are simple brute force actions, overcome as soon as site managers are able to deploy mitigation measures or, in some cases, comply with extortion demands. But while NYMag.com is still unavailable, the story has continued to proliferate through other channels. New York ‘s Instagram account has published pictures and quotes from four of the women, which the magazine’s Twitter account has continued to promote throughout the outage. A cached version of the story is also available through Archive.org, although not all of the functionality is present. Print distribution of New York has been unaffected by the attack. Source: http://www.theverge.com/2015/7/27/9047765/new-york-magazine-bill-cosby-rape-story-ddos-attack

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New York Site DDoS attack After Massive Cosby Story Goes Online

‘Zombie’ network protocols become DDoS threats

Attackers won’t let RIPv1 rest in peace. Attackers continue to search for obsolete protocols that are no longer used but still running on networked computer systems in order to abuse them as denial of service amplifiers. Content delivery network firm Akamai’s PLXsert security team discovered that the routing information protocol version 1, introduced in 1988, was used in a denial of service attack against its customers in May this year. RIPv1 was designed for small networks in the early internet era. It broadcasts lists of routes and updates to devices listening for RIPv1 information. A small, 24-byte RIPv1 request with a forged source IP address can result in multiple, 504-byte response payloads, creating a large amount of unsolicited traffic directed towards victims’ networks and flooding them. Attackers were in particular looking for routers that contain large amounts of routes in the RIPv1 database, so as to maximise the traffic volumes and damage done to target networks. Internet luminaries disagree however as to how much of a threat RIPv1 represents. APNIC chief scientist Geoff Huston told iTnews  RIPv1 is late 80s technology that routes the now abandoned Class A/B/C network address structure. “I find it hard to think that RIPv1 is connected to the global internet and that there are enough of them out there to constitute a real threat,” Huston said. Finding even one site in 2015 that is running RIPv1 is “like discovering a Ford Model T on the streets still in working order,” Huston said. Director of architecture for internet performance company Dyn, Joe Abley, pointed out that the problem is not that operators use RIPv1 for routing, it’s that administrators leave RPv1 turned on. The protocol has been unsuitable for the past two decades because it doesn’t work with classless inter-domain routing. “Just because you no longer have any use for a protocol doesn’t mean you always remember to turn it off,” he told iTnews . “What is happening is that ancient systems that have been hidden in dark corners for decades are suddenly jumping out into the sunlight and running amok because someone realised they could provoke them into bad behaviour, from a distance.” He said there are end-systems connected to the internet that support the ancient routing protocol and which have it turned on by default. Old Sun Microsystems Solaris servers are examples of such systems that are now being abused as packet amplifiers in denial of service attacks. RIPv1 does not use authentication, leaving it wide open to anyone on the internet to connect to. The attack is not fundamentally different from reflection attacks using the domain name system, chargen, simple network management protocol, or any one of a variety of user datagram-based protocols, Abley said. “This attack is not new and special really, although the fact that it uses RIP certainly brings a roguish twinkle to this aged network administrator’s eye,” he said. It can however cause large traffic floods. “Akamai’s Prolexic team have seen attacks that delivered over 10 gigabit per second of traffic towards a single victim,” Abley said. “I wouldn’t categorise that as ‘not really a problem’, especially if I was the one on the receiving end.” Abley said as with most amplification attacks, “poking the bear from a great distance relies upon being able to fake the source address of the stick.” There would be fewer opportunities for this happen if network operators followed the advice in Internet Engineering Task Force best current practice documents such as BCP38, which details network ingress filtering and similar texts to protect their networks. Source: http://www.itnews.com.au/News/406090,zombie-network-protocols-become-ddos-threats.aspx#ixzz3eqpq5n9E

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‘Zombie’ network protocols become DDoS threats

Anonymous DDoS UAE banking websites

Several UAE banks were hit by a co-ordinated cyber attack, known in the trade as a distributed-denial-of-service (DDoS) attack, on Tuesday, crippling e-banking operations and websites, and leaving the unnamed institutions fearing further assaults, Arabian Business’ sister websiteITP.net has reported. German systems integrator Help AG, which played a central role in the clean-up for one of the victims, told the website that the DDoS attack, which has been linked to cyber group Anonymous, happened on the last day of the month as the attackers sought to wreak maximum disruption during the banks’ busiest period. Help AG cited “sources in the market” who report “widespread” incidents in the UAE financial sector. A DDoS attack uses tens, sometimes hundreds, of thousands of computers to synchronise a bombardment of packet-traffic on a server. In the absence of sophisticated mitigation solutions, servers can be brought down and services brought to a halt. “Picking the last day of a month is a very wise choice from the attackers, as it is a widely known fact that the last three days of a calendar month are the busiest ones in the financial industry, as a lot of money is changing hands in the form of salaries, mortgage and loan payments,” Nicolai Solling, director of technology services, Help AG, told ITP.net by email.   Help AG’s systems identified hundreds of thousands of packets per second sustained for a number of hours on one UAE-based financial services institution. The attacks, the company said, were “not sophisticated in form”, but “followed very much the usual pattern of Anonymous, meaning application-level depletion attempts”. “Typically this is in the form of ‘get’ requests on the Web layer, which then tries to exhaust the Web servers, unfortunately something that often is too easy to achieve,” Solling explained. Anonymous is a global movement with no clear leadership, although it has spawned specific cyber groups such as LulzSec that perform co-ordinated campaigns on high-profile targets. This week’s attack was part of what the group calls #OpArabia. At the time of writing, the group listed several targets in Saudi Arabia, Egypt and the UAE on justpaste.it. Help AG did not disclose the identity of any victims, but the National Bank of Abu Dhabi (NBAD) was featured prominently on the list. “Help AG has for a period been aware of a number of threats on the region posed from Anonymous,” Solling said. Source: https://en-maktoob.news.yahoo.com/anonymous-cyber-hackers-hit-uae-banking-websites-112413582.html

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Anonymous DDoS UAE banking websites

CSIS website goes down due to DDoS attack

The website for CSIS, the Canadian Security Intelligence Service, appears to have gone down again — less than 24 hours after a suspected rogue hacker took the site down in a so-called denial of service attack. The website for Canada’s spy agency went offline shortly after 9 a.m. ET Tuesday. While the cause is still unknown, when the website went down Monday night, sources told CTV’s Mercedes Stephenson that a rogue hacker who had previously launched attacks on several municipal and police websites, had claimed responsibility for the CSIS attack. A denial-of-service attack is not technically a hack into the site, but the attack does prevent Internet users from accessing the website. “Experts I’ve spoken to say it is very hard to stop this kind of attack,” Stephenson told CTV News Channel Tuesday morning. “The level of sophistication and the number of ways they are attacking one website at one time to send it offline is very hard to prevent.” She says sources tell her that the hacker isn’t attempting to steal information in these attacks. “This is all about trying to embarrass the government, intelligence agencies and the police,” she said. The hacker is trying to draw attention to the controversial Bill C-51, as well as the case of an Ottawa teen who was charged in an alleged “swatting” incident. The hacker believes the teen was framed, sources tell CTV. A spokesperson for the Ministry of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness, acknowledged in a statement Monday night that the CSIS website had gone “temporarily offline.” “No information has been breached. We are taking cybersecurity very seriously,” spokesperson Jean-Christophe de Le Rue said. The same hacker was previously connected to hacking group Anonymous, but appeared to be operating alone on Monday, sources said. The person believed to be responsible tweeted out several messages about the CSIS website Monday, including: “I’m deciding if I should let CSIS back online and hit another government website, or if I should keep it offline for a while.” Less than two weeks ago, several government websites — including ServiceCanada.gc.ca and Parl.gc.ca — were hit by a denial of service attack. Anonymous claimed responsibility. Source: http://www.ctvnews.ca/canada/csis-website-goes-down-again-1.2447166

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CSIS website goes down due to DDoS attack

Protests or profiteering? Whether it’s Anonymous, the Cyber Caliphate or Cyber Berkut, the hack remains the same

“Hacktivism” has been around since the Cult of the Dead Cow in the 1980s; only the names have changed. Where we once heard about Chaos Computer Club and the Legion of Doom, we now have high-profile examples like Anonymous, Anti-Sec and Lulzsec. This is not a comparison – 35 years ago it was mostly demonstrations and denials of service. Now, attacks have become exponentially more intrusive and destructive. With this escalation in damages comes a new name. Cyber terrorism is a term that the media has been using quite frequently. There have also been countless articles on the so-called Cyber Caliphate, Cyber Berkut, and even various disparate groups of “cyber freedom fighters” around the world. Is changing “hacktivism” to “terrorism” the government and media’s way of upping the ante on hacking? Indeed, what is the difference between hacktivism and cyber terrorism, if there is one? After all, they both seek out pretty much the same targets. They both have a singular purpose, in its simplest definition – to cause damage to an entity, organisation or group. So what sets these two categories of hackers apart? Is the answer in their motivation? Can we really view one as “good,” and the other “bad”, or is it simply a matter of personal opinion? Anonymous Anonymous is a loose association of activist networks that has an informal and decentralised leadership structure. Beginning in 2003, on the bulletin board 4Chan, Anonymous began to recruit and train young people interested in hacking for a cause. Throughout the years, they have run cyber attacks, mostly distributed denial of service (DDoS) attacks, against the financial, healthcare, education, religious organisations, oil, gas and energy industries – pretty much everything. They have also earned a spot on that distinguished list of attackers who have targeted consumer electronics giant Sony. Anonymous has really changed the nature of protesting. In 2013, Time magazine listed it as one of the top 100 influential “people” in the world. Supporters have called the group “freedom fighters” and even compared them to a digital Robin Hood. Others, however, consider them little more than cyber terrorists. In the public’s eye, it depends on their motivation, following and targets. The bottom line: This could either be a case of malicious activity masked by political motivation, or pure malicious activity. Cyber Berkut Cyber Berkut is a modern group of hacktivists and claims its name from the Ukrainian special police force “Berkut”, formed in the early 1990s. This pro-Russian group made a name for itself by conducting DDoS attacks against the Ukrainian government and Western corporate websites conducting business in the region. The group has also been known to penetrate companies and attempting to retrieve sensitive data. Following a heist, they would post on public-facing pastebin sites or their own non-English website, which includes a section called “BerkutLeaks”. Cyber Berkut was most recently credited for attacks against the Chancellor of the German Government, NATO, Polish websites and the Ukrainian Ministry of Defence. The group has been compared to Anonymous based on its methods of protest and political targets. Viewed as passionate about its targets, Cyber Berkut has a clear agenda. However, the group’s ideology in no way diminishes the amount of intended damage that might be inflicted on potential victims. Cyber Caliphate Cyber Caliphate, as the name implies, is a hacker group that associates with the Islamist terrorist group ISIS. It has attacked many different government and private industry entities, and claims responsibility for multiple website defacements and data breaches. The group has hacked various websites and social media accounts, including those of military spouses, US military command, Malaysia Airlines, Newsweek and more. Indeed, Cyber Caliphate is hungry for media attention. This raises the question: does Cyber Caliphate believe in its stated cause, or is this just opportunistic hacking under the cover of a cause for media attention? What if the group is just looking for fame and fortune? What if the group is not a group at all, but the work of one or two people collaborating with different contributors for specific targets? Motive doesn’t matter Is this really cyber terrorism, hacktivism or just another set of hackers trying to get famous by jumping on the media’s hot topic of the month? In some cases, it may seem romantic when people claim to be fighting for a cause – rather than more nefarious intent, or even just for a laugh. But the fact remains that cyber attacks are cyber attacks, whether they are motivated by politics, money or a distorted idea of fame. The key to fighting back – after ensuring that your organisation’s security is up to snuff – is threat intelligence. Threat intelligence gathering is the key to keeping up with the actions of these groups and their potential targets with impartial, straightforward news, gathered by specialists. Staying abreast of potential hacktivist attacks requires a proper investment in intelligence groups with the proper tools, people, processes and other resources to deliver up-to-date information. And not just about the groups, but the techniques they might be using. Information sharing among intelligence groups from different industries and countries also will help expedite the reverse engineering of malicious code and assist in the building of signature content and correlation logic that is deployed to our security technologies. So once attacks are observed globally, defences can be quickly built, detection logic integrated – and information disseminated to the security specialists on the front line who may be all that stands in the way of the kind of corporate meltdown that nearly sank Sony Pictures in December last year. Source: http://www.computing.co.uk/ctg/opinion/2414910/protests-or-profiteering-whether-its-anonymous-the-cyber-caliphate-or-cyber-berkut-the-hack-remains-the-same

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Protests or profiteering? Whether it’s Anonymous, the Cyber Caliphate or Cyber Berkut, the hack remains the same

Cost to launch DDoS attack from botnets for hire

Could you pass up a $40,000 return on a $20 investment? Odds are you couldn’t if you enjoy wreaking havoc on a business. New research released today by Incapsula shows distributed denial of service (DDoS) assaults continue to be expensive nuisances for online businesses — and that the attacks can be launched from botnets-for-hire for around $38 a month. A DDoS attack costs a business $40,000 per hour in terms of lost business opportunities, loss of consumer trust, data theft, intellectual property loss and more, Incapsula estimates. When you consider top attacks last for days and that half of all targets are repeatedly hit, it’s easy to see how quickly costs escalate. A Lot for a Little “What is most disconcerting is that many of these smaller assaults are launched from botnets-for-hire for just tens of dollars a month. This disproportion between attack cost and damage potential is the driving force behind DDoS intrusions for extortion and vandalism purposes,” the security firm noted in its 2015 DDoS Threat Landscape Report (registration required). Last year Incapsula reported a 240 percent increase in DDoS activity. This year, although DDoS activity is still rising, Incapsula highlighted shifts in the methods, length and types of attacks. Incapsula defines an attack as a persistent DDoS event against the same target (IP address or domain). It is preceded by a quiet (attack free) period of at least 10 minutes and succeeded by another such period of the same duration or longer. The study differentiates between network layer and application layer attacks. These definitions refer to the Open Systems Interconnection model (OSI Model), which conceptualizes the process of data transmission by segmenting packets into seven layers. Network layer attacks target the network and transport layers (OSI layers 3 and 4), while application layer attacks target OSI layer 7. The analysis is based on data from 1,572 network layer and 2,714 application layer DDoS attacks on websites using Imperva Incapsula services from March 1 through May 7. “Assaults against network infrastructures continue to grow in size and duration. Those aimed at applications are both long in duration and likely to be repetitive. The upshot for organizations of all sizes is that simply weathering the storm is no longer a viable strategy — the impact will be big, durable and likely recurring,” the report notes. On That Depressing Note Here are a few of the report’s key findings: Once a target, always a target: 20 percent of websites are attacked more than five times DDoS attacks can last a long time: While 71 percent of all network layer attacks last under three hours, more than 20 percent last more than five days Some attacks are exceptionally long: The longest attack was 64 days DDoS for hire is more readily available than ever: Botnet-for-hire fingerprints are on roughly 40 percent of all attacks Five countries create most DDoS botnet traffic : 56 percent of DDoS bot traffic emerged from China, Vietnam, US, Brazil and Thailand What’s a Botnet-for-Hire? Opportunistic cybercriminals have the botnet-for-hire business model, a subscription scheme that provides each user with limited access to the botnet resources (usually for a cumulative duration of no more than 60 minutes per month). “During these short periods, individuals with little or no DDoS skill are able to execute assaults using one of the few available scripts (which are reminiscent of our definition of attack vectors),” the report notes. The average cost to rent-a-botnet for an hour each month through a DDoS subscription package is around $38, with fees as low as $19.99. The takeaway: It costs very little to bring down a website. “Perhaps putting a price tag on the damage caused by such services will bring more public attention to their activity, and to the danger posed by the shady economy behind DDoS attacks,” the report notes. Source: http://www.cmswire.com/information-management/you-can-bring-down-a-website-for-38/

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Cost to launch DDoS attack from botnets for hire

Anonymous Knocks Pro-Nazi Websites Offline with DDoS Attacks

Anonymous hackers decided to commemorate the 70th anniversary of the defeat of Nazi forces in 1945, by Anonymous Sweden deciding to knock pro-Nazi websites offline in motion of the 70 year old victory. Hacktivists in Sweden took it upon themselves to celebrate the 70th anniversary of the victory over Nazi forces in Germany by knocking offline pro-Nazi affiliated domains hosted exclusively by Swedish companies. Targets were limited but extremely well known with well-over hundreds of thousands of monthly visitors. Specific targets included nordfront[dot]se and svenskarnasparti[dot]se, which were both taken offline by a large Distributed Denial of Service (DDoS) Attack and have been inaccessible for several days. The domains remain offline during the time of writing this article and were initially taken offline mid afternoon Friday. Depending on the size of the attack, the domains could remain offline and inaccessible for several days as they have been already. Anonymous Sweden announced their news on Pastebin, with a letter to pro-Nazi websites that were apart of their targeted attack, stating: Today it’s 70 years since nazi-Germany fell. But nazis is still marching in Europe.. Attacking peaceful protesters and spreading fear across the world. It is our duty to remember what happend and never let the horrors be forgotten.. It is our duty to fight nazism. Today we Will wipe the nazis of the webs! Main targets Www.nordfront.se Server info : Apache/2.2.22 (Debian) mod_fcgid/2.3.6 mod_ssl/2.2.22 OpenSSL/1.0.1e IP: 176.10.250.104 is their dotted decimal Www.svenskarnasparti.se Server info: its a worldpress site with cloudfare “Protection” We are Anonymous We do not forgive We do not forget Hitler-fan boys, its time to expect us! /Anonymous Sweden with friends! Special thanks to PH1K3 United as one divided by zero Anonymous started their attacks May 8th, and the domains are still offline nearly 48 hours later. The Swedish collective did not note any specific groups for taking part other than releasing the news via pastebin. We will keep you updated. Source: http://freedomhacker.net/anonymous-knocks-pro-nazi-websites-offline-ddos-attack-4106/

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Anonymous Knocks Pro-Nazi Websites Offline with DDoS Attacks