Tag Archives: denial of service

Internet Service Providers Under DDOS Attack in Mumbai, Probe Ordered

“Thus, an attack on ISPs is an attack on the nation”. Internet Service Providers (ISPs) in Mumbai are facing an unprecedented attack by hackers which has reduced surfing speeds in the city. Inspector General of Police (Cyber Crime) Brijesh Singh said, “Some unknown people are involved in crashing the ports of Internet Service Providers by making lakhs of requests at a particular terminal at a particular time, which we call “Distributed Denial Of Service”. According to the post on The Hindu, IGP (Cyber Crime) Brijesh Singh said, ‘An FIR has been filed with the Cyber police station in BKC under sections 43 (F) and 66 of the Information Technology Act. They also said the attack was still being carried out. “We have registered an FIR and started tracking down the operators who are trying to crash the servers or ports of ISPs”, he said, adding that the attack has slowed down the internet services and affected subscribers of ISPs. “We are investigating the matter”. Other than this, it’s not clear which ISPs are affected although this reddit thread claims that Airtel is the primary ISP being DDoSed, which distributes broadband to other smaller companies, leading to network blockages across a wide range of ISPs. The attack, however, still continues. The resources behind the attack have to be considerable. “Kindly bare with us as we are trying to solve this problem in very short period with the help of high skilled technicians. please be with us and let’s fight against these hackers (sic)”. As of Monday morning, small and medium ISPs are still struggling to provide uninterrupted service to users. IT expert Vijay Mukhi says, “The idea of a DDoS is to make a computer or a server very slow so that anyone who uses an ISP’s services can not connect. All a hacker has to do is buy enough infected IP addresses and use them for a DDOS attack”. Typically, DDoS attacks are targeted at big websites or platforms with the intention of taking them down or blocking access to them. Source: http://nanonews.org/internet-service-providers-under-ddos-attack-in-mumbai/

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Internet Service Providers Under DDOS Attack in Mumbai, Probe Ordered

Anonymous Launches DDoS Attacks Against Rio Court Website

Members of the hacktivist collective Anonymous reportedly launched distributed denial-of-service (DDoS) attacks against the website of the Court of Rio de Janeiro for its decision to block WhatsApp in Brazil. The DDoS attacks against the Court of Rio de Janeiro allegedly forced the site offline for a period. Members of Anonymous Brazil confirmed the attack on their Facebook page saying, “Court of Justice of the state of Rio de Janeiro off in protest to the blockade of the WhatsApp.” The Rio Court recently ruled to block WhatsApp in Brazil as the application will not decrypt communications for criminal investigation procedures, according to reports. The Court of Rio de Janeiro had allegedly sent three court orders to receive specific information from WhatsApp related to criminal investigations. WhatsApp implemented end-to-end encryption to its messages between users in April 2016. The message service provider said it is unable to disclose data on these communications. Court orders through out Brazil have previously ordered a ban on WhatsApp for similar reasons during criminal investigations in December 2015, February and May 2016, according to reports. The website of the Court of Rio de Janeiro is fully restored and functional at the time of this post. WhatsApp service in Brazil has also been restored to users through out the country. Source: http://www.batblue.com/anonymous-launches-ddos-attacks-rio-court-website/

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Anonymous Launches DDoS Attacks Against Rio Court Website

Massive DDoS Attack Shut Down Several Pro-ISIS Websites

A team of attackers shut down several ISIS aka Daesh websites against terrorist attacks in Nice and Middle Eastern countries! Terrorism has no religion that’s why whenever a terrorist attack is carried out the victims are innocent people irrespective of race or religion. Hackers and DDoSers, on the other hand, are well aware of the enemy and that’s why recently an attacker going by the handle of ”Mons” conducted a series of DDoS attacks using NetStresser tool just a couple of days ago. The reason for targeting these sites was to protest against the sudden increase of terrorist attacks in France and Middle Eastern countries. In a conversation with HackRead, Mons said that he also got assistance from the owner of BangStresser , the famous DDoSing tool which was allegedly used to shut down BBC’s servers and Donald Trump’s website in one of the largest DDoS attacks ever. However, the attack on pro- ISIS websites varied from 50 Gbps to 460 Gbps. Mons further stated that ”We worked together to take down several ISIS websites. This is for obvious reasons. We want to help in any way we can to weaken their influence that threatens and, to some length, literally destroys our very democracy and human rights. Especially after the recent attacks in France and Arabic countries, our wrath has grown. This war needs to be fought on many fronts, and we try to cover one of them.” Here is a screenshot showing the list of targeted websites along with tweets that show earlier attacks on pro-ISIS sites. Upon checking the history on some targeted sites we can confirm the sites were spreading violent content along with terrorist ideology however at the time of publishing this article some sites were restored while some were listed for sale. This is not the first time when attackers have targeted pro-ISIS platforms. In the past, Anonymous did not only conduct cyber attacks but also exposed companies hosting those sites  — Anonymous had also blamed  CloudFlare for protecting terrorists’ websites  from DDoS attacks but the company had denied the allegations. Source: https://www.hackread.com/ddos-attack-on-pro-isis-websites/

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Massive DDoS Attack Shut Down Several Pro-ISIS Websites

US Congress websites recovering after three-day DDoS attack

Library of Congress among the victims to go temporarily offline. Several websites owned and operated by the United States Congress are recovering from a three-day distributed denial-of-service (DDoS) attack. The DDoS campaign began on July 17 when the websites for the Library of Congress (LoC) began experiencing technical difficulties. A day later, the websites went temporarily offline: During the attack, Library of Congress employees were unable to access their work emails or visit any of the Library’s websites. Softpedia reports the attackers ultimately overcame initial defense measures to escalate their campaign. Specifically, they brought down two additional targets: congress.gov, the online portal for the United States Congress; and copyright.gov, the website for the United States Copyright Office. On Tuesday morning, things started to get back to normal. Some email accounts were functioning, writes FedScoop, but other online properties by the LoC remained offline. As of this writing, the three government portals affected by the attack are back online. Tod Beardsley, a senior research manager for Boston-based cybersecurity firm Rapid7, feels that denial-of-service attacks remain popular because of how difficult it is for a target to mitigate a campaign while it is still in progress. As he told FedScoop : “DoS attacks that leverage DNS as a transport is a common mechanism for flooding target sites with unwanted traffic for two reasons. [First,] DNS traffic is often passed through firewalls without traffic inspection, since timely responses to DNS are critical for many networked environments. [And] second, DNS nearly always uses User Datagram Protocol, or UDP, rather than Transmission Control Protocol, or TCP, and UDP-based protocols like DNS are connectionless. As a result of this design, it’s easier for attackers to forge data packets with many fake source addresses, making it difficult to filter good data over bad.” Network filtering devices can help, but only if a company decides to buy one. Perhaps the Library of Congress didn’t own such a device or lacked a service provider with expertise in mitigating DoS/DDoS attacks. There’s little companies can do to protect against DDoS attacks, as script kiddies with a few bucks can rent a botnet online to attack whichever target they choose. With that in mind, organizations should prepare for these attacks by investing in DDoS mitigation technologies that can in the event of an attack help accommodate and filter attack traffic. Source: https://www.grahamcluley.com/2016/07/congress-website-ddos/

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US Congress websites recovering after three-day DDoS attack

HSBC Website Suffers DDoS Attack

OurMine Hacking group conducted a massive DDoS attack on HSBC websites forcing the sites to go offline in UK and the USA! The official domain of HSBC (Hongkong and Shanghai Banking Corporation) came under massive distributed denial-of-service (DDoS) attack on 12July affecting domain in UK and the USA. The DDoS attack was conducted by OurMine hacking group which previously made headlines for hacking social media accounts of high-profile tech celebrities including Facebook’s Mark Zuckerberg and Google’s Sundar Pichai but this is the second DDoS attack  after WikiLeaks last week. Currently, the reason for targeting HSBC bank is unknown though according to SoftPedia the cyber attack was stopped within few hours after one of HSBC’s staffs contacted the attackers. “Hello, We stopped the attack of HSBC Bank! a staff of HSBC Talked with us,” stated the hackers on their official blog. Screenshot shared by attackers shows HSBC’s UK and US domains are down! It is unclear if the bank was targeted for ransom or just for fun, however, this is not the first time when HSBC faced such attacks. In January 2016 hacktivists from New World Hacktivists (NWH) claimed responsibility for a DDoS attack on HSBC’s mobile servers on payday. As far as OurMine is concerned, it is the same group who hacked  Google’s CEO Sundar Pichai Quora account which was also linked to his Twitter account, the group also hacked Facebook’s CEO Mark Zuckerberg Twitter and Pinterest accounts and last but not the least the official Twitter account of Twitter’s CEO Jack Dorsey was also taken over by the same group. DDoS attacks have been increasing with every passing day . In the past, DDoS attacks were conducted just for fun or to shut down servers but now hackers attack sites for ransom and keep them down until a ransom is paid. The ProtonMail DDoS attack is a fine example of how these attacks are becoming another online mafia to steal money. At the time of publishing this article, both targeted sites were reachable. Source: https://www.hackread.com/hsbc-website-suffers-ddos-attack/  

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HSBC Website Suffers DDoS Attack

Anonymous Legion claims attack on Minnesota courts website

The international activist hacker group Anonymous Legion is claiming responsibility for an attack on the Minnesota Judicial Branch’s website that rendered it unusable for most of Wednesday. State officials became aware of the “distributed denial-of-service” (DDoS) attack about 8 a.m. Wednesday, around the same time Anonymous Legion e-mailed the Star Tribune. “Servers have also been penetrated and data has been secured, contrary to what they will tell you,” said Anonymous Legion’s e-mail. “This will occur frequently.” The group said the act was executed “collectively, through a global attack.” It is known for DDOS attacks on government websites, among others. The attack is similar to ones that interrupted the site last December. Last year’s attacks were traced to Asia and Canada. The state did not say Wednesday whether the attacks may be linked. “We are in the process of communicating with the FBI Cyber Task Force about this incident,” Beau Berentson, a spokesman for the state court administration office, said in a written statement. The website (www.mncourts.gov), visited by thousands every day looking to access court resources and information, was taken offline as the attack was investigated. Access to the site was restored around 5:15 p.m. “We have no evidence that any secure data has been inappropriately accessed,” Berentson said. Other online resources linked through the website are still functioning, including eFiling and eService, the Court Payment Center and remote access to district and appellate court records. The website was down for several hours from Dec. 21 to 31 in the previous attacks. “In a DDOS attack, an outside entity attempts to overwhelm an online resource with so much network traffic that it is no longer accessible to legitimate users,” State Court Administrator Jeff Shorba said in a January statement about last year’s attacks. “During these attacks, the Minnesota Judicial Branch did not experience any form of data breach or inappropriate access to court records, nor is there any evidence to suggest that the attackers attempted to gain access to Judicial Branch records or information.” Those attacks were reported to the federal government and Canadian authorities. “DDoS attacks are becoming increasingly common against high-profile websites in both the public and private sectors,” Shorba said in January. “While we cannot prevent these attacks from being launched, the Minnesota Judicial Branch is now better prepared to respond to these types of attacks in the future.” Source: http://www.startribune.com/minnesota-courts-website-attacked-again-by-hackers/384003231/

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Anonymous Legion claims attack on Minnesota courts website

Overwatch Servers Went Down After Alleged DDoS Attack

Infamous hacker group Lizard Squad is thought to be at it again, this time taking down Overwatch servers and leaving players unable to join and remain in a session. Over the past week, Blizzard has been experiencing some problems with Battle.net that have made it difficult for players to use the service as intended with games like Overwatch . Now, there’s word that these issues might have been caused by a DDoS attack launched by members of hacker group Lizard Squad. Some users are reporting that they are unable to log in to Battle.net. Others are able to enter, but find themselves kicked out of multiplayer matches in Overwatch for seemingly no reason. Ordinarily, issues like these would be brushed off as being part and parcel of the modern online experience. However, a suspicious tweet from a known Lizard Squad member has led to the group being implicated, according to a report from VG247. The above tweet is being taken as proof that Lizard Squad member AppleJ4ck was involved with the attack. Some Overwatch players responded to his post to vent their annoyance about the situation — to which AppleJ4ck responded, “in a way, I’m doing y’all a favor.” This is not the first time that Lizard Squad has targeted organizations within the video game industry. The group rose to prominence back in 2014, when a coordinated attack brought down the PlayStation Network and Xbox Live over Christmas, causing massive headaches for the companies involved. Of course, the attack was not an unmitigated success for the group, as the high-profile hack made Lizard Squad an immediate target for authorities. Just days later, a 22-year-old alleged to be a part of the organization was the subject of a raid by police in the United Kingdom. However, the strength of a group like Lizard Squad is the fact that they are spread all over the world. Individual members can be found and brought to justice, but it’s difficult to make a concerted attempt to stamp out its activity outright. If the situation is hard on the authorities, then it’s even more challenging for a company like Blizzard. The overwhelming popularity of Overwatch means its hard enough for the company to keep Battle.net afloat at the best of team, never mind when there are hackers on the prowl. Unfortunately, criminal elements like Lizard Squad are part and parcel of the modern online experience. Companies like Blizzard have to take these groups into consideration when operating a service like Battle.net — hackers have the power to ruin the experience for the rest of us, and the only defence is a robust level of security. Source: http://gamerant.com/overwatch-servers-down-ddos-attack-846/

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Overwatch Servers Went Down After Alleged DDoS Attack

Defending against DDoS-Day

It was tax time in Australia, 2014, and one Sydney tax agent, like many others across the country, was all-hands-on-deck as staff took endless calls and filled appointment diaries. The frantic pace was welcomed at the young firm, which prided itself on being hip, casual, and cool. The firm’s slick, mobile-friendly website and a good search engine ranking brought a decent rush of new clients to the firm each year. So when the site went on- and offline over the course of a week, phones stopped ringing and staff panicked. The firm was on the receiving end of a distributed denial-of-service (DDoS) attack from IP addresses out of Eastern Europe that overwhelmed the small business IT infrastructure. An email in the company’s generic inbox demanded that US$1,000 be wired to a Western Union account in order for the attacks to stop. “We called our tech guys and they tried to block it,” a senior tax accountant told CRN on condition of anonymity. “We called the cops, but no-one could fix it quickly enough so we paid.” The price was cheap compared to the damage wrought. And fears that the criminals would just ask for more money once the ransom was paid were unfounded; the attacks stopped abruptly and no more was heard from them. Booters and stressers When a dam threatens to breach, it helps to have a network of diversion channels where the water can flow away from the towns below. So it is that a wave of DDoS packets can be soaked up by throwing large networks in front of the target. The floods are becoming more common, but their nature is changing to something more efficient and dangerous than in previous years. Akamai’s latest release of the popular State of the Internet report for the last quarter of 2015 finds a 149 percent increase in total DDoS attacks and a 169 percent increase in infrastructure layer attacks over the same period in 2014. The “vast majority” of these attacks were from so-called booter or stresser providers, the DDoS-for-hire services that operate with a gossamer-thin veil of legitimacy for customers who pay hourly to monthly rates to point the attacks at their own infrastructure. Of course, many who use the services point the booters at rival businesses, governments and, notably, live-stream gaming video channels operated by rivals. These attacks have “increased dramatically”, Akamai says, compared to the preceding three months, with use of network timing attacks that power the booters up by 57 percent on the previous quarter. Such attacks abuse the network timing protocol so a small query generates a large response, which is redirected at a target. “Network Time Protocol amplification attacks have be used in large-scale DDoS attacks peaking shy of 400Gbps, but DNS amplification attacks have also been successfully used to cripple infrastructure and cause serious financial losses,” BitDefender senior threat analyst Adrian Liviu Arsene says. “One of the largest DDoS attack to date was reported to have reached around 500Gbps, although the standard is somewhere around 100Gbps.” Motive and intent Distributed denial-of-service is the second most likely digital attack to be familiar to the average pedestrian after viruses. The method of attack hit mainstream headlines some six years ago, when online activist group Anonymous brought down major websites, including Paypal, the Recording Industry Association of America and the sites of Canberra public agencies. Systematic arrests followed, bursting the bubble of those participants who thought safety in numbers would shield their IP addresses from being singled out by police. It signalled a fall in popularity of DDoS as a means of protest. The criminal undercurrent remains and here cash is king, but motivations still vary. Businesses use DDoS attacks to knock off rivals and criminals to send sites offline until a ransom is paid. Yet others use the digital flood as a diversion to distract security defenders and set off alarms while they hack into back-end systems. One group known as DDoS for Bitcoin, or DDoS4BC, is using the proven anonymity of the crypto-currency to extort companies through DDoS. It is a safer model for criminals than that which ripped through the Sydney tax accountancy, and considerably more expensive for victims. It is, as of January, known to have hit more than 150 companies around the world, first sending an extortion note demanding between AU$5,600 and a whopping AU$112,000 in Bitcoins before launching small DDoS attacks to demonstrate the group’s capabilities. For some victims, the DDoS may be short-lived and devoid of any apparent motive, according to Verizon Enterprise Solutions investigative response managing principal Ashish Thapar. “We have definitely seen DDoS on the rise and several of our partners are logging double the [usual] number of incidents,” Thapar says. “We are also seeing DDoS attacks bringing companies them to their knees but not entirely offline, which acts as a smokescreen for advanced persistent threat attacks at the back end.” That’s also something Secure Logic chief executive officer Santosh Devaraj has seen. The company hosts iVote, the electronic voting system for NSW, and last year bagged the $990,000 contract to operate it until 2020. “There are ‘DDoS for hire’ groups we’ve seen as part of monitoring iVote that may be trying to gain access to infrastructure at the back,” Devaraj says. “The real threat may not be the DDoS.” DDoS down under Australian businesses are less targeted than those overseas, experts agree, thanks in part to our smaller internet pipes. But with the NBN rolling out, DDoS Down Under is expected to become big. The midmarket is likely to be hit harder, BitDefender’s Arsene says. “Midmarket DDoS attacks are likely to rise as the chances of targets actually paying are higher than for other organisations,” he says. “[Criminals] specifically target midmarket companies that don’t have the technical resources to fend off such attacks.” Akamai chief strategist John Ellis agrees, saying extortionists “tend to hit the sites with a large online presence”. “For cyber adversaries, the [midmarket] provides a fantastic target,” Ellis adds. “A Sydney developer team that relies heavily in online app availability, for example, may have to seriously consider whether it rolls over and pays DDoS extortionists.” The attacks in Australia are, for now, fairly small. “We are seeing bigger DDoS attacks, but they’re nowhere near the size of attacks in the US,” says Melbourne IT cloud and mobile solutions general manager Peter Wright.  “It is partly because infrastructure and bandwidth limitations reduce the size of DDoS attacks. It is an attribute of infrastructure capacity and there is a risk that, as we broaden the pipes [as part of the National Broadband Network], it brings huge benefits but increases the risk profile as well.” Sinking feeling Big banks are smashed by DDoS attacks every day and largely do not bat an eyelid. Online gambling companies, too, across Australia are blasted during big sporting events. These top end of town players have expensive, tried-and-tested scrubbing mechanisms to largely neuter DDoS attacks, although some betting agencies are known to have regularly paid off attackers during the Melbourne Cup, treating it as a cost of business. The midmarket is not left to its own devices, however. Hosting providers like Melbourne IT and others offer DDoS protection against applications and services, while other companies have cheaper offerings for the budget market. “I am sympathetic to the midmarket, their need for bang-for-buck,” Ellis says. “The challenge for the midmarket is that they don’t have the money that they need… they should focus on business outcomes and partners who understand their business and design outcomes.” For Secure Logic’s Devaraj, DDoS mitigation comes down to a solid cyber security operations centre. “It is where I believe the industry should invest, rather than a particular technology.” Yet companies can use free or cheap DDoS protection from the likes of CloudFlare, or opt for do-it-yourself options that require hardening of security defences – something the average small technology shop may lack the ability to do. “There are DDoS sinkholes and capabilities with our cloud partners,” Wright says. “If a resource or function is hit, we can move workloads to other resources dynamically.” Arsene agrees. “Midmarket tech guys need to start by incorporating DDoS attack risks into their corporate security strategies. Using a secure and managed DNS that supports changing internet protocols on the fly is also recommended, as well as patching software vulnerabilities to mitigate application layer attacks.” Source: http://www.crn.com.au/feature/defending-against-ddos-day-419470/page1 http://www.crn.com.au/feature/defending-against-ddos-day-419470/page2

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Defending against DDoS-Day

Flaw in Juniper’s JunOS router software could cause DDoS flood

Juniper has disclosed that that a problem with the Junos router could enable DDoS attacks Juniper has admitted that a vulnerability in IPv6 processing on its Junos router OS could allow malicious packets to be sent to networks resulting in a DDoS attack on infrastructure. In an advisory, the firm said the flaw could enable a specially crafted “IPv6 Neighbor Discovery” (ND) packet to be accepted by the router rather than discarded. “The crafted packet, destined to the router, will then be processed by the routing engine (RE).  A malicious network-based packet flood, sourced from beyond the local broadcast domain, can cause the RE CPU to spike, or cause the DDoS protection ARP protocol group policer to engage. When this happens, the DDoS policer may start dropping legitimate IPv6 neighbors as legitimate ND times out,” the firm said. The firm added that this is similar to the router’s response to any purposeful malicious IPv6 ND flood destined to the router. “The difference is that the crafted packet identified in the vulnerability is such that the forwarding controllers/ASICs should disallow this traffic from reaching the RE for further processing,” according to the advisory. It said that following investigations, only its MX, PTX, and QFX products have been confirmed to experience this behaviour. Juniper added that no fix was presently available at the time of writing and neither was a complete workaround. “Security best current practices (BCPs) of filtering all ND traffic at the edge, destined to network infrastructure equipment, should be employed to limit the malicious attack surface of the vulnerability,” the firm advised. Rich Barger, chief intelligence officer at ThreatConnect, told SCMagazineUK.com that organisations should look to either filter the protocol or packet (if possible). “It looks as if Juniper has included edge firewall rules that can block the neighbour discovery packets as a means to buffer any vulnerable devices,” he said. Richard Cassidy, technical director EMEA at Alert Logic, said that this flaw represents a serious issue for organisations that “Dual Stack” networking with IPv6 and IPv4. He told SC that the issue was “essentially a DDoS attack, through a specially crafted IPv6 ND packet, that can be targeted at JunOS routers from remote attackers. It is fairly simple to identify router OS versions through scanning techniques, which of course leaves most organisations at risk at some level, given the prevalence of Juniper in networking infrastructures globally.” Alex Cruz Farmer, VP of cloud at Nsfocus, told SC that almost every network around the world is considering or planning IPv6 if they have not already. “With this in mind, it’s crucial that the protection is implemented now, to avoid this security hole being exploited in future.” Source: http://www.scmagazineuk.com/flaw-in-junipers-junos-router-software-could-cause-ddos-flood/article/501681/

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Flaw in Juniper’s JunOS router software could cause DDoS flood

Anonymous DDoS and shutdown London Stock Exchange for two hours

Anonymous hacktivists take down the London Stock Exchange website for more than two hours as part of protest against world’s banks The online hacktivist group, Anonymous reportedly shut down the London Stock Exchange (LSE) website last week for more than two hours as part of a protest against world’s banks and financial institutions. According to the Mail on Sunday, the attack was carried out by Philippines unit of Anonymous on June 2 at 9am. Previous targets have included the Bank of Greece, the Central Bank of the Dominican Republic and the Dutch Central Bank. The newspaper says: “Anonymous claims the incident was one of 67 successful attacks it has launched in the past month on the websites of major institutions, with targets including the Swiss National Bank, the Central Bank of Venezuela and the Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco.” A spokesperson for the LSE declined to comment on the incident, however, the attack most likely took the form of a distributed denial of service (DDoS) attack, meaning trading would not have been affected and no sensitive data would have been compromised. In the 24 hours before the LSE site went down, the group also claims that the attack on the LSE was the latest in a series that has also seen it target the websites of NYSE Euronext, the parent company of the New York Stock Exchange and the Turkey Stock Exchange, as part of a campaign called Operation Icarus. According to the newspaper, City of London Police said it was not informed that the LSE website had gone down and had no knowledge of the attack. However, the latest attack may not be a complete surprise. In a video posted to YouTube on May 4, a member of the amorphous group announced in that “central bank sites across the world” would be attacked as part of a month-long Operation Icarus campaign. The video statement said: “We will not let the banks win, we will be attacking the banks with one of the most massive attacks ever seen in the history of Anonymous.” By using a distributed-denial-of-service (DDoS) cyberattack, the group also successfully disrupted the Greek central bank’s website. In light of that event, a separate video was posted to YouTube on May 2. The masked individual representing Anonymous group said: “Olympus will fall. How fitting that Icarus found his way back to Greece. Today, we have continuously taken down the website of the Bank of Greece. Today, Operation Icarus has moved into the next phase.” The Anonymous spokesperson added: “Like Icarus, the powers that be have flown too close to the sun, and the time has come to set the wings of their empire ablaze, and watch the system their power relies on come to a grinding halt and come crashing down around them. We must strike at the heart of their empire by once again throwing a wrench into the machine, but this time we face a much bigger target – the global financial system.” Source: http://www.techworm.net/2016/06/anonymous-ddos-shutdown-london-stock-exchange-two-hours.html

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Anonymous DDoS and shutdown London Stock Exchange for two hours