Tag Archives: windows

DDoS attack brings Qatar’s Al Jazeera website to its knees

Hacking attempts come amid diplomatic crisis in the Gulf Qatar-based news network Al Jazeera yesterday said it was being targeted with systematic hacking attempts.…

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DDoS attack brings Qatar’s Al Jazeera website to its knees

FCC blames DDoS for weekend web lockout

Not down to people trying to file comments on issues rhyming with wetsuit balloty, it insists Vid   Problems faced by consumers hoping to submit comments to the Federal Communications Commission over the weekend were caused by a denial of service attack, the US government agency admits.…

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FCC blames DDoS for weekend web lockout

Mysterious Hajime botnet has pwned 300,000 IoT devices

The Dark Knight of malware’s purpose remains unknown Hajime – the “vigilante” IoT worm that blocks rival botnets – has built up a compromised network of 300,000 malware-compromised devices, according to new figures from Kaspersky Lab.…

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Mysterious Hajime botnet has pwned 300,000 IoT devices

Advanced Windows botnet spreads Mirai malware

Kaspersky Lab experts are analyzing the first Windows-based spreader for the Mirai malware as part of a concerted effort to close down Mirai botnets in the wild. The Windows bot appears to have been created by a developer with more advanced skills than the attackers who unleashed the massive Mirai-powered DDoS attacks in late 2016, a fact that has worrying implications for the future use and targets of Mirai-based attacks. The malware author is likely … More ?

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Advanced Windows botnet spreads Mirai malware

How to Identify a DDoS Attack

DDoS stands for Distributed-Denial-of-Service. It basically means that a surge of information cuts you off from your network i.e. your server or your web host, disallowing access to web services. In recent times, a series of DDoS attacks have taken place, which is proven but the statistics put together by Arbor Networks’ 12th Annual Worldwide Infrastructure Security Report (WISR). The report indicates that incidences of DDoS attacks have risen 44% compared to last year. In fact, 53% of the service providers that were surveyed mentioned that 53 percent they are seeing more than 21 DDoS attacks per month, up from 44 percent last year. It is important to know if your network is under an attack, and take the necessary correction steps. Especially if you are an online business, a DDoS attack can wreak havoc, stopping your operations completely. An attack is initiated by sending a flood of traffic to your server or web host, thereby, eating into your available bandwidth and server resources. In effect, the original user, which is you, are left without access to web services. In extreme situations, the server may crash too. In fact, the attack is not launched from one source, making it difficult to track down a single IP in computer and data logs. The attacker generally infects user networks, including personal computers, mobiles, and IoT devices and so on, through his or her malware-infected machines. That is where the complexity of identifying a DDoS attack arises- it can quickly spiral into large proportions. Also, a DDoS attack can strike without warning, most hackers do not believe in sending threats before carrying out the hack. It may look like your website server or hosting domain is down, while in reality it may be a DDoS attack. Even elaborate server tests may just indicate a high traffic, which may appear normal. Hence it is important to be on the vigil and consider that you may indeed, be under a DDoS attack: Here are the key clues to look out for: An IP address makes x requests over y seconds, many times consistently, or IP addresses may repeat frequently: If you spot this behaviour for specific IPs, you can direct traffic from those IPs to specific NULL routes. This will bypass your servers. At the same time, make it a point to whitelist some of the valid IPs. Your server responds with a 503 error citing a service outage: Windows allows you to schedule alerts when a specific event happens in Event Viewer. Allocate a task to an event (such as errors or warnings). Similarly, allocate a task to a 503 event by opening Event Viewer, right clicking on the event, and set up a configuration to send an email to an administrator or to a team of people. Loggly can help you with this in case of multiple servers. Ping requests time out: Move beyond manually pinging servers to test response. A number of web pinging services are available, such as, UpTimeRobot, Pingdom, Mon.itor.us, InternetSeer, Uptrends and others. You can configure the frequency at which you want your site to ping from world-over. If a time out occurs, it is reported back to you or your team. Logs show a huge spike in traffic: Loggly can be used as a lookout for DDoS attacks. It not only shows traffic spikes but also their occurrence date and time, their originating servers and user errors. The logs and alerts can be designed to be more specific, for example, base your alerts on a combination of events and traffic spikes, so as to do away with false alerts. It is not practically possible for any human to keep looking out for these signs. One must automate notification systems. Loggly is a useful tool that can send these alerts to external messaging platforms too, such as Slack, or Hipchat. Of course, it is important that you learn how to perfectly configure an alert, to catch the right indicators, at the same time avoiding an overload of alerts. Source: http://www.readitquik.com/articles/networking-2/a-guide-to-identify-ddos-attack/

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How to Identify a DDoS Attack

Finns chilling as DDoS knocks out building control system

Hint: next time, buy a firewall before you’re attacked Residents in two apartment buildings in the Finnish town of Lappeenranta had a chill-out lasting more than a week after a DDoS attack battered unprotected building management systems.…

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Finns chilling as DDoS knocks out building control system

?How to defend against the internet’s doomsday of DDoS attacks

Last week assault on Dyn’s global managed DNS services was only the start. Here’s how to fend off hackers’ attacks both on your servers and the internet. We knew major destructive attacks on the internet were coming. Last week the first of them hit Dyn, a top-tier a major Domain Name System (DNS) service provider, with a global Distributed Denial of Service (DDoS)attack. As Dyn went down, popular websites such as AirBnB, GitHub, Reddit, Spotify, and Twitter followed it down. Welcome to the end of the internet as we’ve known it. Up until now we’ve assumed that the internet was as reliable as our electrical power. Those days are done. Today, we can expect massive swaths of the internet to be brought down by new DDoS attacks at any time. We still don’t know who was behind these attacks. Some have suggested, since Dyn is an American company and most of the mauled sites were based in the US, that Russia or Iran was behind the attack. It doesn’t take a nation, though, to wreck the internet. All it takes is the hundreds of millions of unsecured shoddy devices of the Internet of Things (IoT). In the Dyn onslaught , Kyle York, Dyn’s chief strategy officer said the DDoS attack used “tens of millions” devices. Hangzhou Xiongmai Technology, a Chinese technology company, has admitted that its webcam and digital video recorder (DVR) products were used in the assault. Xiongmai is telling its customers to update their device firmware and change usernames and passwords. Good luck with that. Quick: Do you know how to update your DVR’s firmware? The attack itself appears to have been made with the Mirai botnet. This open-source botnet scans for devices using their default username and password credentials. Anyone can use it — China, you, the kid next door — to generate DDoS attacks. For truly damaging DDoS barrages, you need to know something about the internet’s architecture, but that’s not difficult. Or, as Jeff Jarmoc, a Salesforce security engineer, tweeted, “In a relatively short time we’ve taken a system built to resist destruction by nuclear weapons and made it vulnerable to toasters.” That’s funny, but it’s no joke. Fortunately, you can do some things about it. Securing the Internet of Things First, and this unfortunately is a long-term solution, IoT vendors must make it easy to update and secure their devices. Since you can’t expect users to patch their systems — look at how well they do with Windows — patching must be made mandatory and done automatically. One easy way to do this is to use an operating system, such as Ubuntu with Snap, to update devices quickly and cleanly. These “atomic” style updating systems make patches both easier to write and deploy. Another method is to lock down IoT applications and operating systems. Just like any server, the device should have the absolute minimum of network services. Your smart TV may need to use DNS, but your smart baby monitor? Not so much. That’s all fine and dandy and it needs to be done, but it’s not going to help you anytime soon. And, we can expect more attacks at any moment. Defending your intranet and websites First, you should protect your own sites by practicing DDoS prevention 101. For example, make sure your routers drop junk packets. You should also block unnecessary external protocols such as Internet Control Message Protocol (ICMP) at your network’s edge. And, as always, set up good firewalls and server rules. In short, block everything you can at your network edge. Better still, have your upstream ISP block unnecessary and undesired traffic. For example, your ISP can make your life easier simply by upstream blackholing. And if you know your company will never need to receive UDP traffic, like Network Time Protocol (NTP) or DNS, your ISP should just toss garbage traffic into the bit bin. You should also look to DDoS mitigation companies to protect your web presence. Companies such as Akamai, CloudFlare, and Incapsula offer affordable DDoS mitigation plans for businesses of all sizes. As DDoS attacks grow to heretofore unseen sizes, even the DDoS prevention companies are being overwhelmed. Akamai, for example, had to stop trying to protect the Krebs on Security blog after it was smacked by a DDoS blast that reached 620 Gbps in size. That’s fine for protecting your home turf, but what about when your DNS provider get nailed? You can mitigate these attacks by using multiple DNS providers. One way to do this is to use Netflix’s open-source program Denominator to support managed, mirrored DNS records. This currently works across AWS Route53, RackSpace CloudDNS, DynECT, and UltraDNS, but it’s not hard to add your own or other DNS providers. This way, even when a DDoS knocks out a single DNS provider, you can still keep your sites up and running. Which ones will work best for you? You can find out by using Namebench. This is an easy-to-use, open-source DNS benchmark utility. Even with spreading out your risk among DNS providers, DNS attacks are only going to become both stronger and more common. DNS providers like Dyn are very difficult to secure. As Carl Herberger, vice president for security solutions at Radware, an Israeli-based internet security company, told Bloomberg, DNS providers are like hospitals: They must admit anyone who shows up at the emergency room. That makes it all too easy to overwhelm them with massive — in the range of 500 gigabits per second — attacks. In short, there is no easy, fast fix here. One way you can try to keep these attacks from being quite so damaging is to increase the Time to Live (TTL) in your own DNS servers and caches. Typically, today’s local DNS servers have a TTL of 600 seconds, or 5 minutes. If you increased the TTL to say 21,600 seconds, or six hours, your local systems might dodge the DNS attack until it was over. Protecting the internet While the techniques might help you, they don’t do that much to protect the internet at large. DNS is the internet’s single point of total failure. That’s bad enough, but as F5, a top-tier ISP notes, DNS is historically under-provisioned. We must set up a stronger DNS system. ISPs and router and switch vendors should also get off their duffs and finally implement Network Ingress Filtering, better known as Best Current Practice (BCP)-38. BCP-38 works by filtering out bogus internet addresses at the edge of the internet. Thus, when your compromised webcam starts trying to spam the net, BCP-38 blocks these packets at your router or at your ISP’s router or switch. It’s possible, but unfortunately not likely, that your ISP has already implemented BCP-38. You can find out by running Spoofer. This is a new, open-source program that checks to see how your ISP handles spoofed packets. So why wasn’t it implemented years ago? Andrew McConachie, an ICANNtechnical and policy specialist, explained in an article that ISPs are too cheap to pay the small costs required to implement BCP-38. BCP-38 isn’t a cure-all, but it sure would help. Another fundamental fix that could be made is response rate limiting (RRL). This is a new DNS enhancement that can shrink attacks by 60 percent. RRL works by recognizing that when hundreds of packets per second arrive with very similar source addresses asking for similar or identical information, chances are they’re an attack. When RRL spots malicious traffic, it slows down the rate the DNS replies to the bogus requests. Simple and effective. Those are some basic ideas on how to fix the internet. It’s now up to you to use them. Don’t delay. Bigger attacks are on their way and there’s no time to waste. Source: http://www.zdnet.com/article/how-to-defend-against-the-internets-doomsday-of-ddos-attacks/  

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?How to defend against the internet’s doomsday of DDoS attacks

ProtonMail restores services after epic DDoS attacks

After several days of intense work, Switzerland-based end-to-end encrypted e-mail provider ProtonMail has largely mitigated the DDoS attacks that made it unavailable for hours on end in the last week.

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ProtonMail restores services after epic DDoS attacks

Crypto e-mail provider ProtonMail pays ransom to stop DDoS attack, attack continues

Switzerland-based end-to-end encrypted e-mail provider ProtonMail has been on the receiving end of a heavy DDoS attack since Tuesday, November 3, and unavailable to its users for hours on end. Pro…

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Crypto e-mail provider ProtonMail pays ransom to stop DDoS attack, attack continues